Programming

You don’t know JS: up and going

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you don't know js: up & goingYou don’t know JS: up and going: It’s easy to learn parts of JavaScript, but much harder to learn it completely or even sufficiently whether you are new to the language or have used it for years. With the “You Don’t Know JS” book series, you ll get a more complete understanding of JavaScript, including trickier parts of the language that many experienced JavaScript programmers simply avoid. The series first book, Up & Going, provides the necessary background for those of you with limited programming experience. By learning the basic building blocks of programming, as well as JavaScripts core mechanisms, you’ll be prepared to dive into the other, more in-depth books in the series and be well on your way toward true JavaScript. With this book you will: Learn the essential programming building blocks, including operators, types, variables, conditionals, loops, and functions Become familiar with JavaScript’s core mechanisms such as values, function closures, this, and prototypes Get an overview of other books in the series and learn why it’s important to understand all parts of JavaScript.

 

JavaScript (/ˈdʒɑːvəˌskrɪpt/), often abbreviated as JS, is a high-level, interpreted programming language. It is a language which is also characterized as dynamic, weakly typed, prototype-based and multi-paradigm.

Alongside HTML and CSS, JavaScript is one of the three core technologies of the World Wide Web. JavaScript enables interactive web pages and thus is an essential part of web applications. The vast majority of websites use it, and all major web browsers have a dedicated JavaScript engine to execute it.

As a multi-paradigm language, JavaScript supports event-driven, functional, and imperative (including object-oriented and prototype-based) programming styles. It has an API for working with text, arrays, dates, regular expressions, and basic manipulation of the DOM, but the language itself does not include any I/O, such as networking, storage, or graphics facilities, relying for these upon the host environment in which it is embedded.

Initially only implemented client-side in web browsers, JavaScript engines are now embedded in many other types of host software, including server-side in web servers and databases, and in non-web programs such as word processors and PDF software, and in runtime environments that make JavaScript available for writing mobile and desktop applications, including desktop widgets.

Although there are strong outward similarities between JavaScript and Java, including language name, syntax, and respective standard libraries, the two languages are distinct and differ greatly in design; JavaScript was influenced by programming languages such as Self and Scheme.

 

originally published: 2015
Author: Kyle Simpson

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