Understanding Basic Calculus By S.K. Chung

Understanding Basic Calculus By S.K. Chung

Understanding Basic Calculus By S.K. Chung – This book is a revised and expanded version of the lecture notes for Basic Calculus and other similar courses offered by the Department of Mathematics, University of Hong Kong, from the first semester of the academic year 1998-1999 through the second semester of 2006-2007. It can be used as a textbook or a reference book for an introductory course on one variable calculus. In this book, much emphasis is put on explanations of concepts and solutions to examples.

By reading the book carefully, students should be able to understand the concepts introduced and know how to answer questions with justification. At the end of each section (except the last few), there is an exercise. Students are advised to do as many questions as possible. Most of the exercises are simple drills. Such exercises may not help students understand the concepts; however, without practices, students may find it difficult to continue reading the subsequent sections. Chapter 0 is written for students who have forgotten the materials that they have learnt for HKCEE Mathematics. Students who are familiar with the materials may skip this chapter. Chapter 1 is on sets, real numbers and inequalities.

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Since the concept of sets is new to most students, detail explanations and elaborations are given. For the real number system, notations and terminologies that will be used in the rest of the book are introduced. For solving polynomial inequalities, the method will be used later when we consider where a function is increasing or decreasing as well as where a function is convex or concave. Students should note that there is a shortcut for solving inequalities, using the Intermediate Value Theorem discussed in Chapter 3. Chapter 2 is on functions and graphs. Some materials are covered by HKCEE Mathematics. New concepts introduced include domain and range (which are fundamental concepts related to functions); composition of functions (which will be needed when we consider the Chain Rule for differentiation) and inverse functions (which will be needed when we consider exponential functions and logarithmic functions).

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