Think Like a Freak PDF by Steven D. Levitt

Think Like a Freak PDF

Download Think Like a Freak PDF book free by Steven D. Levitt – From Think Like a Freak PDF: With their trademark blend of captivating storytelling and unconventional analysis, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner take us inside their thought process and teach us all how to think a bit more productively, more creatively, more rationally. Buy from Amazon

Think Like a Freak PDF

In Think Like A Freak, they offer a blueprint for an entirely new way to solve problems, whether your interest lies in minor lifehacks or major global reforms. The topics range from business to philanthropy to sports to politics, all with the goal of retraining your brain. Along the way, you’ll learn the secrets of a Japanese hot-dog-eating champion, the reason an Australian doctor swallowed a batch of dangerous bacteria, and why Nigerian e-mail scammers make a point of saying they’re from Nigeria.

Levitt and Dubner plainly see the world like no one else. Now you can too. Never before have such iconoclastic thinkers been so revealing—and so much fun to read.

After writing Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, we started to hear from readers with all sorts of questions. Is a college degree still “worth it”? (Short answer: yes; long answer: also yes.) Is it a good idea to pass along a family business to the next generation? (Sure, if your goal is to kill off the business—for the data show it’s generally better to bring in an outside manager.*) Whatever happened to the carpal tunnel syndrome epidemic? (Once journalists stopped getting it, they stopped writing about it—but the problem persists, especially among blue-collar workers.) Think Like a Freak PDF

Some questions were existential: What makes people truly happy? Is income inequality as dangerous as it seems? Would a diet high in omega-3 lead to world peace? People wanted to know the pros and cons of: autonomous vehicles, breast-feeding, chemotherapy, estate taxes, fracking, lotteries, “medicinal prayer,” online dating, patent reform, rhino poaching, using an iron off the tee, and virtual currencies. One minute we’d get an e-mail asking us to “solve the obesity epidemic” and then, five minutes later, one urging us to “wipe out famine, right now!” Readers seemed to think no riddle was too tricky, no problem too hard, that it couldn’t be sorted out. It was as if we owned some proprietary tool—a Freakonomics forceps, one might imagine—that could be plunged into the body politic to extract some buried wisdom. If only that were true! Think Like a Freak PDF

Editorial Reviews

Review – Think Like a Freak PDF

“Utterly captivating.” (Malcolm Gladwell, New York Times bestselling author of BlinkThe Tipping Point, and David and Goliath)

“Over nine entertaining chapters [Levitt and Dubner] demonstrate how not to fall into hackneyed approaches to solving problems and concretely illustrate how to reframe questions.” (New York Daily News)

“Compelling and fun.” (New York Post)

“This book will change your life.” (Daily Express (London))
Think Like a Freak PDF
“Good ideas… expressed with panache.” (Financial Times)

“An interesting and thought-provoking read.” (The Horn)

“Their most revolutionary book yet. With their trademark blend of captivating storytelling and unconventional analysis, they take us inside their thought process and teach us all to think a bit more productively, more creatively, more rationally — to think, that is, like a Freak.” (Bookreporter.com)

Review – Think Like a Freak PDF

If you’re a fan of Freakonomics and Super Freakonomics, you’ll love this book. Here’s why:

Like many other people, after reading both of the Freakonomics books, I felt like I learned a ton, but I wasn’t sure how it would apply directly to my life.

And that’s okay. They weren’t writing a self help book, and I read their work because I was genuinely curious in understanding how the world works.

But this book departs from their usual method of explaining how the world works and instead shows you how you can better live in the world.

And that’s why I believe this is their best book yet.

Here’s a little summary of what I learned:

1. In one chapter, the three hardest words in the english language, they talk about one of the main problems that plagues people today – the inability to say “I don’t know.” And they show you how it’s a deadly combination because “cocky plus wrong” is a recipe for disaster. They then show you how to avoid making this mistake. They even give a word for word script you can use.

2. In another chapter, “WHat’s your problem,” they share the story of Kobayashi and how he became a professional hot dog – and food eater. They walked through his entire process and how he went on to eat 50 hot dogs when people thought eating 30 was impossible. And even though they’re talking about hot dogs, you’ll see how this can apply to everyone.

As an example, back when I started creating videos for Social Triggers TV, a friend of mine told me they were filming about 6 videos a day. And I thought, “Well, I’m new at this ther’s no way ill get there.” And I would film 3 videos a day. Eventually, as I got good, I got to the magic number – 6 videos in a day and I felt like I was on top of the world. Until I spoke to another friend who told me they do 15 or 20 videos in a day. I was SHOCKED. But I went back to the drawing board, refined my process, and eventually got up to 17 videos in a day.

I’m being vague here, mainly because I want you to read the book. But it’s funny seeing how the same process I used to increase my video production was used by the hot dog champ as well.

3. And my favorite part of the book is when they talk about what they call “the once and done” technique. If you’re a non-profit, you’ll LOVE reading about this because you’ll see how you can potentially increase donations a drastic amount by using this simple marketing tactic.

And that’s it.

Great book and I suggest you buy it and read it.

From the Back Cover

Put away your moral compass. Learn to say “I don’t know.” Think like a child.
Take a master class in incentives. Appreciate the upside of quitting. . . . And more! Think Like a Freak PDF

Think Like a Freak is Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner’s most revolutionary book yet. With their trademark blend of captivating storytelling and unconventional analysis, they take us inside their thought process and teach us all to think a bit more productively, more creatively, more rationally—to think, that is, like a Freak.

Levitt and Dubner offer a blueprint for an entirely new way to solve problems, whether your interest lies in minor lifehacks or major global reforms. As always, no topic is off-limits. They range from business to philanthropy to sports to politics, all with the goal of retraining your brain. Along the way, you’ll learn the secrets of a Japanese hot-dog-eating champion, the reason an Australian doctor swallowed a batch of dangerous bacteria, and why Nigerian e-mail scammers make a point of saying they’re from Nigeria. Think Like a Freak PDF

Never before have such iconoclastic thinkers been so revealing—and so much fun to read.

Think Like a Freak PDF by Steven D. Levitt: eBook Information

  • Full Book Name – Think Like a Freak
  • Author of this Book -Steven D. Levitt
  • Language – English
  • Book Genre – Self Help, Psychology
  • Download Format – PDF
  • Size – 1 MB
  • eBook Pages – 255

About the Author

Steven D. Levitt, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago, was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, given to the most influential American economist under forty. He is also a founder of The Greatest Good, which applies Freakonomics-style thinking to business and philanthropy.

Stephen J. Dubner, an award-winning journalist and radio and TV personality, has worked for the New York Times and published three non-Freakonomics books. He is the host of Freakonomics Radio and Tell Me Something I Don’t Know.

Think Like a Freak PDF

Stephen J. Dubner is an award-winning author, journalist, and radio and TV personality. He quit his first career—as an almost rock star—to become a writer. He has since taught English at Columbia, worked for The New York Times, and published three non-Freakonomics books. You might also like rich dad poor dad by Robert Kiyosaki

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