The Frights of Fiji by Sunayna Prasad

Share this:
The Frights of Fiji by Sunayna Prasad

Download The Frights of Fiji by Sunayna Prasad pdf book free online – From The Frights of Fiji by Sunayna Prasad: Sent to live with her strict, aloof, and uncaring uncle after her parents are killed in a car accident, twelve-year-old orphan Alyssa McCarthy longs for the life she used to have—one filled with fun and love.

Then one stormy night, a message appears in the raindrops on the window that will change everything.

“Your life will never be the same again, as magic will interfere.”

Before long, Alyssa is kidnapped by Master Beau, a banished sorcerer with a mysterious connection to her who can only regain his power by weakening hers. Suddenly hurled into a world of wizardry filled with fantastical beasts and marvelous technology beyond her wildest imagination, Alyssa must defeat Master Beau if she ever wants to get home again. But Master Beau will stop at nothing, including using Alyssa’s friends, to ensure he is triumphant.

Originally titled “From Frights to Flaws”, this story is the exciting and enchanting first book in the “Magical Missions” series.

Review

“Debut author, Sunayna Prasad hits the mark in herfirst in series Y/A Fantasy From Frightsto Flaws.” – Chanticleer Reviews

In The Frights of Fiji, Sunayna Prasad has created an enchanting world for kids to escape into while reading this exciting children’s fantasy and magic book, The Frights of Fiji. She has developed fun characters that are likable, relatable and even a bit awkward. In today’s world many kids are subjected to living their lives within dysfunctional families, just like the protagonist, Alyssa. I think this is a real plus, as pre-teens and teens, alike, will feel and welcome the emotion of this story. The world-building in this book is impressive, colorful and expressive putting the readers on the scene in this other-worldly magical realm on the mesmerizing island of Yanowic. The creative descriptive writing, along with the meaningful dialog between the characters, will hold the attention, and fully captivate young readers as they journey along with Alyssa and her friends throughout this fascinating story. This is the first book in the “Magical Missions” series and I have found author, Sunayna Prasad to be a highly imaginative, exceptional storyteller and a remarkable writer. – Artisan Book Reviews –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review of The Frights of Fiji by Sunayna Prasad

Author Sunayna Prasad weaves a well-crafted coming of age fantasy. The story had every element a good story should have. An interesting and captivating plot, attention to detail, but best of all fleshed out, well-written and well-rounded character development. There’s plenty of imagery in the writing style that makes you feel like you are right there in the story, and that’s something I look for in a good book.

The book description gives a sneak preview: ‘Sent to live with her strict, aloof, and uncaring uncle after her parents are killed in a car accident, twelve-year-old orphan Alyssa McCarthy longs for the life she used to have—one filled with fun and love. Then one stormy night, a message appears in the raindrops on the window that will change everything.

“Your life will never be the same again, as magic will interfere.”

Before long, Alyssa is kidnapped by Master Beau, a banished sorcerer with a mysterious connection to her who can only regain his power by weakening hers. Suddenly hurled into a world of wizardry filled with fantastical beasts and marvelous technology beyond her wildest imagination, Alyssa must defeat Master Beau if she ever wants to get home again. But Master Beau will stop at nothing, including using Alyssa’s friends, to ensure he is triumphant.’

Now, if you want to find out what happens, you’ll just have to turn the pages for yourself! However, I will say it was well worth the read. This is my first time reading this author and I must say I was very impressed.

I enjoyed the story, character development, and dialogue. There were plenty of plot twists that I didn’t see coming and that added to the book’s mystique. When I stopped reading to work, I found myself wondering what happened in the book, and replaying parts of the novel in my head to see if I could figure more out. It has been a while since I enjoyed a book this much.

The Frights of Fiji (Alyssa McCarthy’s Magical Missions Book 1) had me engaged from the first page to the last. It’s an excellent book for children who enjoy a good fantasy tale. The story flowed from scene to scene with ease, and the author shows exceptional ability when it comes to storytelling. There are plenty of attention-grabbing moments in this page turner that will take the younger reader on a spellbinding journey!

It’s one of those books that comes along occasionally that will make you want to read it non-stop until you get to the end. For those looking for an interesting, three-dimensional and stimulating read, this would be a great find. I’m giving nothing further away here. And this, I hope, will only add to the mystery and enjoyment for the reader.

I’ll certainly be looking forward to reading more from Sunayna Prasad in the future. I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in fantasy, adventure and plenty of magic. It would also make a great selection for the younger book clubs. A well-deserved five stars from me.

Review of The Frights of Fiji by Sunayna Prasad

Full disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

First off, let me say that the very first page reminded me of Harry Potter. I don’t know whether or not this was the author’s intention, and the resemblance utilized such a classic trope that only Harry’s popularity makes the comparison possible. Having said that, I would also say that, though there are a few other notable details that call to mind that long-running series (case in point, Isabelle’s tent that is bigger on the inside in Chapter 9 and I solemnly swear that I absolutely would sell my house and camp for the rest of my life if I had one of those and I HATE camping), the critical similarities end… on the very first page.

As much as I prefer pure fantasy, I’m game for a good blend of magic and mundane, and this story delivered, from the Wiphones to the magic testing facility and more. Not only that, I appreciate the characterization of the main character Alyssa… a teenager who is determined to do all she can to protect herself and the people she loves, but who naturally runs into problems convincing those people to listen to her due to her age and other factors beyond her control. And of course there is the villain, a toxic individual who demeans her as a crybaby and wimp when she displays the very natural fear at his efforts to harm her and her family, and who… well, to avoid spoilers, let’s just say that he doesn’t see himself as the villain.

There are, perhaps, only a few areas where I had trouble with the story.
One of those details appears to be a source of confusion for Alyssa as well, and that is the matter of Simon’s nature. Simon is a living statue–or rather, a MARBLE FIGURE; according to him, statues aren’t alive, therefore he isn’t a statue. (Because of course that logic can’t possibly apply to marble figures. Insert eye roll here.) There may well be a cultural distinction that I’m missing, but I can’t tell if it’s a distinction that only applies within the story or if there is a genuine difference between statues and (non-living) marble figures in real life besides the specific point that he is made of marble.
Another detail has to do with Uncle Bruce. In terms of motivation the story treats him as a caring father and uncle whose grief left him damaged and unable to offer Alyssa and his own daughter Hailey the emotional support they need, and it appears that we the readers are meant to sympathize with him as such. He does, after all, try to protect his daughter and niece, and he is ready to listen to Alyssa once he sees proof that magic was real all along. But in terms of specific action, his lack of trust in Alyssa and Hailey and decision to deny them anything enjoyable, forcing them to meet adult standards to earn their childhood fun (case in point, his choice of babysitter at the beginning), and even his refusal to allow Alyssa to contact her legal guardian, all of this can easily be mistaken for a toxic parenting style that takes power as higher priority than the child’s total well-being.
And to wrap this up, a few final issues that confused me are most likely problems of a technical nature–writing style, etc–rather than story-centric problems. One of those problems is: Mrs. Wilson’s (chapter 5) and Leon’s insistence that the girls and her own daughter Jasmine did not hear a voice in Jasmine’s room solely because Mrs. Wilson and Leon (while on a completely different floor) did not hear it themselves. The voice was said to have been loud, but this point was made only after the girls had been protesting for a while that they really did hear it. The other issue is with the character Madison: first she is surprised that Alyssa has power for their landline, even though Madison is the one who had placed the call. Second is that she tells Alyssa that her parents won’t discuss a crisis situation over the phone…. because they’re making breakfast.

Biography

I was born in Houston, Texas on November 22nd, 1993. I moved to Long Island, New York shortly after turning one. I attended school from 1998 and graduated in 2011. I started writing stories at around six years old. I wrote until the age of ten, when I took a break for six years. I returned to writing stories at about sixteen years old. Ever since then, I enjoyed writing stories, particularly for children.

Download The Frights of Fiji by Sunayna Prasad

Share this:

Comment