The Emotionally Intelligent Manager by David R. Caruso

The Emotionally Intelligent Manager by David R. Caruso

Download The Emotionally Intelligent Manager by David R. Caruso PDF book free online – From The Emotionally Intelligent Manager by David R. Caruso PDF: We have long been taught that emotions should be felt and expressed in carefully controlled ways, and then only in certain environments and at certain times. Buy From Amazon

This is especially true when at work, particularly when managing others. It is considered terribly unprofessional to express emotion while on the job, and many of us believe that our biggest mistakes and regrets are due to our reactions at those times when our emotions get the better of us. David R. Caruso and Peter Salovey believe that this view of emotion is not correct. The emotion centers of the brain, they argue, are not relegated to a secondary place in our thinking and reasoning, but instead are an integral part of what it means to think, reason, and to be intelligent. In The Emotionally Intelligent Manager, they show that emotion is not just important, but absolutely necessary for us to make good decisions, take action to solve problems, cope with change, and succeed. The authors detail a practical four-part hierarchy of emotional skills: identifying emotions, using emotions to facilitate thinking, understanding emotions, and managing emotions―and show how we can measure, learn, and develop each skill and employ them in an integrated way to solve our most difficult work-related problems.

Review

“Emotions are a human asset. Caruso and Salovey show you how to increase your return on that asset. This is a marvelous work helping to legitimize emotions in the workplace.”
―Richard E. Boyatzis, professor and chair, Department of Organizational Behavior, Case Western Reserve University, and coauthor, Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence

“The authors do a rare and important thing―they translate critical concepts from cutting-edge science into something that can be understood and used effectively at work every day. To succeed in today’s workplace, managers, and their employees, need to have the emotional intelligence skills discussed in this book.”
―Sigal Barsade, professor, the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

“A systematic, disciplined approach harnessing the value and unleashing the power of emotions in the workplace through the creation of a new franchise player―the Emotional Athlete. The optimization of this athlete will be the next real competitive differentiator on the corporate land scape.”
―Roseanna DeMaria, former first vice president, leadership & performance, Merrill Lynch and former senior vice president, enterprise risk, AT&T Wireless Services

“This is an introspective guide to becoming a more effective manager. It demonstrates how tuning in to your emotions and those you work with and knowing how to manage them will help you succeed.”
―Lillian Vernon, founder, Lillian Vernon Corporation

“Not just a description of emotional intelligence, this book maps out for managers across many kinds of organizations how to assess, learn, and apply these important skills.”
―Jean M. Broom, senior vice president, human resources and general affairs, ITOCHU International Inc.

“This book is for everyone, not only managers but for every individual in organizations―you will find out just how important emotions are at work.”
―Masao Ueminami, manager, human resource and general affairs division, NEC Electronics Corporation

“David and Peter take the ‘mystery’ out of Emotional Intelligence and allow the business person to find and practice ways of becoming a better and more effective leader using the knowledge and practice of emotions. Lots of practical applications for leaders written in a way that can immediately improve the EI capacity of those that choose to improve.” – Janet Matts, Leadership Practice Director, Johnson & Johnson.

From the Inside Flap

We have long been taught that emotions should be felt and expressed in carefully controlled ways, and then only in certain environments and at certain times. This is especially true when at work, particularly when managing others. It is considered terribly unprofessional to express emotion while on the job, and many of us believe that our biggest mistakes and regrets are due to our reactions at those times when our emotions get the better of us.

David R. Caruso and Peter Salovey believe that this view of emotion is not correct. The emotion centers of the brain, they argue, are not relegated to a secondary place in our thinking and reasoning, but instead are an integral part of what it means to think, reason, and to be intelligent. In The Emotionally Intelligent Manager, they show that emotion is not just important, but absolutely necessary for us to make good decisions, take action to solve problems, cope with change, and succeed. The authors detail a practical four-part hierarchy of emotional skills: identifying emotions, using emotions to facilitate thinking, understanding emotions, and managing emotions 212;and show how we can measure, learn, and develop each skill and employ them in an integrated way to solve our most difficult work-related problems.

From the Back Cover

We have long been taught that emotions should be felt and expressed in carefully controlled ways, and then only in certain environments and at certain times. This is especially true when at work, particularly when managing others. It is considered terribly unprofessional to express emotion while on the job, and many of us believe that our biggest mistakes and regrets are due to our reactions at those times when our emotions get the better of us.

David R. Caruso and Peter Salovey believe that this view of emotion is not correct. The emotion centers of the brain, they argue, are not relegated to a secondary place in our thinking and reasoning, but instead are an integral part of what it means to think, reason, and to be intelligent. In The Emotionally Intelligent Manager, they show that emotion is not just important, but absolutely necessary for us to make good decisions, take action to solve problems, cope with change, and succeed. The authors detail a practical four-part hierarchy of emotional skills: identifying emotions, using emotions to facilitate thinking, understanding emotions, and managing emotions 212;and show how we can measure, learn, and develop each skill and employ them in an integrated way to solve our most difficult work-related problems.

Review

In “The Emotionally Intelligent Manager,” David Caruso and Peter Salovey suggest that emotions add an entirely separate layer to intelligence, providing a set of data beyond the purely cognitive. When leaders and managers are able to effectively utilize their emotional intelligence, they make better decisions and provide better leadership of people and organizations. Caruso and Salovey provide a four-step process to allow leaders to harness their emotional intelligence to its greatest potential.

The authors cite a host of scholars in this burgeoning field of emotional intelligence from a wide array of reputable institutions. They also reference a series of anecdotal examples from the business world and from their own lives to put skin on their message.

With their academic backgrounds, I’m hardly in a position to argue with their main thesis. In fact, I found much of their basic premises to be little beyond common sense. In particular, I totally agree that one of the fundamental necessities for good leadership is the ability to acknowledge and appropriately manage our emotions, rather than denying them, pretending that we do not experience them, or suggesting that emotions are counterproductive for decision-making and achievement. And part of this process of fully embracing reality is a complete willingness to receive honest feedback from others. I find a refusal to acknowledge the truth of my own emotional landscape to be one of the great pitfalls of my own leadership and one that I observe all too often.

My most significant disconnect with the ideas in this book was connected to Chapter 9, in which they describe how leaders should get themselves in the right mood. Very early in this section, they describe “method acting” as an analogy for how leaders should transform their emotional state to something more appropriate for a particular task or situation. This entire notion seemed very manipulative to me. Indeed, actors are supposed to misrepresent themselves and step into another world to demonstrate the life of a character on stage or screen. But in the real world, we are not actors, and I find it very disconcerting that we might grow in our ability to switch from one emotion to another, as circumstances dictate. The idea of forcing myself to switch emotions seems emotionally dysfunctional and very artificial. I acknowledge that particular moods work better for certain tasks, but I would much rather choose my task to fit my mood than choose my mood to fit my task. It seems to me that the idea of putting on an act to experience a desired emotion is dishonest and distasteful.

With this one content-related complaint aside, my primary critiques of this book are more with its presentation than with its ideas. To be perfectly honest, I found this book to be an exhausting and tedious read. I was frustrated that most of the personal examples throughout the book were so generic as to feel almost formulaic (with the exceptions of the stories about Bill Ford, Jack Welch, and Grady Little, which were the most engaging parts of the entire book).

I’m not sure that this book provides much of value, beyond stating an almost obvious main point. I think that the points of highest value in this book (the need for leaders to honestly acknowledge their own emotional status, to accurately assess the emotional well-being of others, and to manage these complex emotional situations with finesse and intentionality) are explained with greater relevance and clarity in other places. Peter Scazzero’s “Emotionally Healthy Spirituality,” for instance, kept me fully engaged and anxious to keep reading, even if I wasn’t wildly enthusiastic about it. Caruso and Salovey’s book seemed to me to be rather insignificant and boring, so I’d be hard pressed to recommend it to anyone.

About the Author

David R. Caruso is a research affiliate in the Department of Psychology at Yale University. He is also a management psychologist. His practice focuses on executive coaching, leadership development, and career assessment. Caruso conducts highly acclaimed training and development seminars on emotional intelligence, and he has published more than two dozen scientific articles and chapters. Prior to starting his own firm, he held a number of staff and line positions in consulting, small business, and Fortune 500 organizations in the areas of strategic planning, market research, and product management.

The Chris Argyris Professor of Psychology at Yale University, Peter Salovey published the first scientific articles on emotional intelligence (with John D. Mayer), introducing the concept to the field of psychology. Salovey also serves as dean of Yale’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and has additional faculty appointments in the School of Management and the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. He is currently president of the Society for General Psychology. A leading authority on the psychological consequences of mood and emotion as well as on health communication, he is widely quoted in print and broadcast media. Salovey was founding editor of the Review of General Psychology and served as an associate editor of the APA journals Emotion and Psychological Bulletin.

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