Engineering

Plasticity for Engineers: Theory and Applications

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Plasticity for Engineers Theory and ApplicationsPlasticity for Engineers: Theory and Applications: This book focuses on the plastic property of materials, and the way in which structures made of such material behave under load. It is intended for civil, mechanical, electro-mechanical, marine, and aeronautical engineers for under-graduate or post-graduate courses or research, and professionals in industry. Professor Calladine, from long experience in teaching, research and industry, here delivers a readable and authoritative account of theory and applications. He presents the classical “perfect plasticity material” as a model of irreversible mechanical behaviour, using this perfect plasticity property to analyse a range of continuum structural problems and metal-forming processes relevant to engineering practice

 

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In physics and materials scienceplasticity describes the deformation of a (solid) material undergoing non-reversible changes of shape in response to applied forces. For example, a solid piece of metal being bent or pounded into a new shape displays plasticity as permanent changes occur within the material itself. In engineering, the transition from elastic behavior to plastic behavior is called yield.

Plastic deformation is observed in most materials, particularly metalssoilsrocksconcretefoamsbone and skin.[3][4][5][6][7][8]However, the physical mechanisms that cause plastic deformation can vary widely. At a crystalline scale, plasticity in metals is usually a consequence of dislocations. Such defects are relatively rare in most crystalline materials, but are numerous in some and part of their crystal structure; in such cases, plastic crystallinity can result. In brittle materials such as rock, concrete and bone, plasticity is caused predominantly by slip at microcracks. In cellular materials such as liquid foams or biological tissues, plasticity is mainly a consequence of bubble or cell rearrangements, notably T1 processes.

For many ductile metals, tensile loading applied to a sample will cause it to behave in an elastic manner. Each increment of load is accompanied by a proportional increment in extension. When the load is removed, the piece returns to its original size. However, once the load exceeds a threshold – the yield strength – the extension increases more rapidly than in the elastic region; now when the load is removed, some degree of extension will remain.

Elastic deformation, however, is an approximation and its quality depends on the time frame considered and loading speed. If, as indicated in the graph opposite, the deformation includes elastic deformation, it is also often referred to as “elasto-plastic deformation” or “elastic-plastic deformation”.

 

Authors

C.R. Calladine

Professor Emeritus of Structural Mechanics, University of Cambridge

Fellow Emeritus of Peterhouse

 

Originally published1 January 1969
Pages: 338
Size: 22 Mb

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