Pharmacy Student Survival Guide by Ruth Nemire

Pharmacy Student Survival Guide pdf

Download Pharmacy Student Survival Guide: Pharmacy Student Survival Guide is a one-of-a-kind roadmap for excelling in pharmacy practice courses. A combination calculations, kinetics, drug information, medical terminology, and laboratory data book all in one, the Guide helps you organize case information, improve problem-solving skills, learn terminology, and impress faculty during rounds.

Pharmacy Student Survival Guide Free Ebook Download

Pharmacy Student Survival Guide is presented in three sections that span the entire pharmacy curriculum:

  • Systems and Expectations covering ethics, communication, monitoring drug therapy, and regulatory agencies
  • Patient Care Tool Box covering medical terminology, pharmacokinetics, laboratory data, and physical assessment
  • Topics in Pharmacy Practice covering Drug Information and Drug Literature Evaluation, Community/Ambulatory Care, Institutional Pharmacy Practice, Public Health, Reducing Health Disparities Through Domestic and Global Outreach to the Undeserved

Valuable for both introductory and advanced practice course, Pharmacy Student Survival Guide is a book you will turn to throughout your entire pharmacy education.

Notice – Pharmacy Student Survival Guide PDF

Medicine is an ever-changing science. As new research and clinical experience broaden our knowledge, changes in treatment and drug therapy are required. The author and the publisher of this work have checked with sources believed to be reliable in their efforts to provide information that is complete and generally in accord with the standards accepted at the time of publication. However, in view of the possibility of human error or changes in medical sciences, neither the author nor the publisher nor any other party who has been involved in the prepara16tion or publication of this work warrants that the information contained herein is in every respect accurate or complete, and they disclaim all responsibility for any errors or omissions or for the results obtained from use of the information contained in this work. Readers are encouraged to confirm the information contained herein with other sources. Pharmacy Student Survival Guide

For example and in particular, readers are advised to check the product information sheet included in the package of each drug they plan to administer to be certain that the information contained in this work is accurate and that changes have not been made in the recommended dose or in the contraindications for administration. This recommendation is of particular importance in connection with new or infrequently used drugs.

Table of Content

Contributors xiii
Preface xvii
Acknowledgments xix
SECTION 1 Systems and Expectations
1 First Practice Course Expectations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Elizabeth Frenzel Shepherd
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Professional Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Curriculum Vitae and Cover Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
The Practice Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Practice Experience Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Introductory Practice Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2 Ethics in Pharmacy Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Nancy S. Collins
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
The Codes of Professional Ethics in Medicine and Pharmacy . . . . . 21
Two Philosophical Theories are Often Referred to in Biomedical
and Clinical Ethics: Utilitarianism and Deontology . . . . . . . . . . . 24
History of (a) How Biomedical Ethics Evolved and the Fundamental
Principles of Biomedical Ethics, (b) How Clinical Ethics Evolved,
and (c) Clinical Applications of Those Principles (Clinical Ethics)
with Case Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Codes of Conduct in the Professions and, Specifically,
Clinical Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Conclusion: The Doctor/Clinician-Patient Relationship is
the Core of Clinical Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
vi Contents
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Answers to Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
3 Pharmacy as a Community-Based Profession . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Kevin R. Kearney
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Service-Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
What Can You Learn From Service-Learning? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
What Do You Need To Do To Learn From Service
in the Community? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Who Benefits From Service-Learning and How? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Reflective Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
4 Communication: An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Michelle T. Assa-Eley, Ceressa T. Ward, and Eric H. Hobson
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Importance of Communication Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Model of Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Potential Barriers to Pharmacist’s Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Oral Communication Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Nonverbal Communication Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Putting It All Together: Patient Interviewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
The What, Why, and How of Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Writing in the Professions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Role-Playing Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Scenario I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Scenario II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Scenario III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Scenario IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Scenario V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Scenario VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Scenario VII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106

Scenario VIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Scenario IX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Scenario X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Scenario XI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Scenario XII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Scenario XIII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Scenario XIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Scenario XV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
5 Rounding, Documentation, and Patient Education . . . . . 114
Sarah L. Johnson, Jacquelyn L. Bainbridge,
Ruth C. Taggart, and Janina Z. P. Janes
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Advanced Practice Experiences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Acknowledgment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
6 Monitoring Drug Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Kelly C. Rogers and Joel R. Pittman
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Steps for Monitoring Drug Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Putting It All Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
7 Regulatory Agencies with Pharmacy Oversight and
Legal Requirements for Filling a Prescription . . . . . . . . . . 162
Karen L. Kier and Ruth E. Nemire
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Administrative Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Drug Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
The Prescription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
viii Contents
SECTION 2 Patient Care Tool Box
8 A Brief Look at the Construction of Medical
Terminology and Common Definitions of Words
That are Part of the Pharmacy Vernacular . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Pat Parteleno, Ruth E. Nemire, and Karen L. Kier
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
What is in a Word? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Definitions of Common Terms Within the Pharmacy Vernacular . . . 197
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
9 Pharmacy Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
A. Timothy Eley
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
The Prescription or Medication Order . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Common Systems of Measurement and Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Calculation of Doses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Ratio Strength and Percentage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Aliquots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Tonicity and Osmolarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Reconstitution and Intravenous Admixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
10 Physical Assessment Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Cristina E. Bello-Quintero and Rachel H. Bardowell
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Basic Physical Assessment Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Putting It All Together . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
11 Interpretation of Clinical Laboratory Data . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Karen L. Whalen and Nancy Borja-Hart
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
Clinical Pearls When Interpreting Laboratory Data . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Urinalysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271

Electrolytes and Blood Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
Cardiac Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284
Lipoprotein Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Endocrine Tests: Thyroid Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
Endocrine Tests: Diabetes Mellitus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
Endocrine Tests: Adrenal Gland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Gastrointestinal Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Hematologic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Coagulation Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Immunologic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Infectious Disease Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Hepatitis A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
Hepatitis B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Hepatitis C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312
12 Designing Patient Treatment Plans: Pharmacokinetic
Foundations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
Sandra B. Earle
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Dosage Regimen Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Basic Calculations to Determine Individual Pharmacokinetic
Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359
SECTION 3 Topics in Pharmacy Practice
13 Drug Information and Drug Literature Evaluation . . . . . 363
Karen L. Kier
Introduction to Drug Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364
Drug Information Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364
Standard References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371
Drug Literature Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372
Professional Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408
14 Community/Ambulatory Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409
Maria Maniscalco-Feichtl and Karen L. Whalen
Community and Ambulatory Care: An Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412
Community Pharmacy Practice: Pharmacy Business Issues . . . . . . . 412
Managing the Clinical Messages/DUR
Messages/Computer Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422
Telepharmacy—Upcoming Changes in Medication Order
Fulfillment Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426
Community Pharmacy Practice: Patient Care Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . 429
Ambulatory Care Pharmacy: Practice Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440
Experiential Education Courses: Managing Activities at the Site . . . . 443
Summary and Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 448
Patient Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449
Community Pharmacy Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450
Ambulatory Care Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452
15 Institutional Pharmacy Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461
Stephanie D. Garrett and Antonia Zapantis
General Hospital Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
Educational Experiences in an Institution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 489
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491
Application Exercise Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492
16 Managed Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510
Sherry Clayton, Karen Martin, and Kathryn Fulks
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511
Business Services in Managed Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513
Clinical Tools in Managed Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514
Outcomes Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517
Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517
For More Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519
17 Public Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
Stuart Feldman and Ruth E. Nemire
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521
Public Health Specialty Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522

Public Health Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525
Public Health Organizations and Institutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 526
Healthy People 2010 and 2020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 529
Public Health Education in the Pharmacy Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . 532
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535
18 Taking it to the Streets: Reducing Health Disparities
Through Domestic and Global Outreach to the
Underserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
Kelly L. Scolaro, Ruth E. Nemire, Lisa D. Inge,
and Hazel Seaba
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538
Advocacy for the Profession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538
Advocacy for the Underserved Patient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 544
Taking the Practice to the Streets, Hillsides, and
Mountain Top Villages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546
Preparation for Outreach Trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548
Getting There . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 549
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 550
Application Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555

Pharmacy Student Survival Guide PDF Preface

Student pharmacists need a textbook to use for learning in general about etiquette, ethics, law, and other topics for practice courses. It should be a book that is the right size for quickly reading and referencing information when in a classroom or completing introductory and advanced practice courses. We feel this text will fulfill that need for students.

TO THE STUDENT

This handbook is one of a few texts that you will use through your entire pharmacy school education. So take a pencil or pen and start scribbling notes in the margins, keep track of the “pearls” you learn in class here in a book where you can find them later. There is no one right way to use this handbook. The important thing is that it does not sit on your shelf as a required text, never to be opened. You bought the book; take the time to see what information is contained within. Think of it as your road map to practice courses; calculations, kinetics, drug information, medical terminology, and laboratory data book all in one.

TO THE FACULTY/PRECEPTOR

Faculty/preceptors often find themselves looking for material that quickly acquaints students with a certain theory, process, or practice. We hope that this text meets those expectations. This text can be used both in the classroom to introduce ideas and during practice courses to help guide students in learning terminology, organizing case information, improving problem-solving skills, and rounding. The book is divided into three working sections: systems and expectations, a toolbox, and pharmacy practice topics. In the systems and expectations section, the authors discuss topics for introductory and advanced pharmacy practice courses, etiquette, ethical issues, service-learning, communication skills, monitoring patients, and the function of a medical team. All chapters are written to help the student become comfortable within the healthcare system and explain the expectations of student pharmacists within that system. Pharmacy Student Survival Guide

Included in the student pharmacist toolbox section are chapters on medical terminology, United States federal regulations, calculations, pharmacokinetics, laboratory data, and physical assessment. The chapters on calculations and pharmacokinetics may be used in a beginning classroom setting when students need to understand big concepts; it will supplement the regular textbook. Instructive chapters dealing with the technical and interpretive aspects of the practice of pharmacy, such as physical assessment, and laboratory testing are included in the toolbox section and can be used by the student during their advanced practice courses to interpret patient findings. Students will be able to use this book early in their pharmacy school curriculum, keep note of their learning, and indicate “pearls” in the margins that they will use later to practice. The last section of the book contains specific topics for pharmacy practice, including chapters addressing the practices of community and institutional pharmacy, the pharmacist as drug information specialist, managed care, public health, and global pharmacy. These chapters are included to round out the text so that it becomes the student practice guide from beginning to end. The final section touches on topics such as missions and the responsibility to advocate for the profession and advance the pharmacist’s involvement in public health. All of the topics are meant to support the knowledge and professional growth of student pharmacists across a curriculum.

Acknowledgement

When there is an accomplishment such as this book, do not presume that those listed as editors are the soul of the book. The authors are at the heart of each individual chapter. They take the seed of an idea and make it their own. The short amount of time, and amount of work required is not sufficiently awarded with thanks. To each of the authors and contributors to this book, you have our abiding gratitude. To those who contributed to the first edition but could not participate in this book, your work laid the foundation for a much improved volume. Last but not least we would be remiss not to thank the people who helped shape ideas into an actual text. Laura Libretti had to collect, and email, and collect information again and again from the authors, thanks for your part in making sure that every author and contributor gets recognized. Thanks to Kim Davis at McGraw-Hill, (our project development editor) because she had to interpret emails, find tables at the last moment, and figure out drawings. Without Kim the book would not be the excellent product that you are reading. To other staff at McGraw-Hill who worked on the book but don’t always get acknowledged, thanks; you know who you are. The last thanks, but not least at all, is for Michael Weitz who championed this book from what I think was his first week as editor at McGraw-Hill. You truly saved the day for the book, and the authors, in more ways than one. You made doing the second edition fun! Thanks.

About the Author

Ruth E. Nemire, PharmD, is a Professor at Touro College in the College of Pharmacy, in Harlem, New York.

Karen L. Kier, PhD, MSc, RPh, is a Professor at Ohio Northern University in the College of Pharmacy in Ada, Ohio.

Download Pharmacy Student Survival Guide

Share this:

Comment