Introduction to Learning and Behavior by Russell A. Powell

Introduction to Learning and Behavior by Russell A. Powell pdf

INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING AND BEHAVIOR provides you with a clear introduction to the basic principles of behavior presented in an accessible, engaging manner. Using examples derived from both animals and humans, the text vividly illustrates the relevance of behavioral principles to understanding and improving human behavior.

The authors demonstrate the application of behavioral principles to such relevant issues as improving your study behavior, reducing procrastination, raising children, and managing relationships. To help you maximize your learning, the text is packed with innovative study and review tools to further your understanding of key concepts.

Editorial Reviews

Review

“With each iteration, it seems to be more complete. . . . I very much like the somewhat informal writing style; I think that really resonates with the students (I know it resonates with me).”

“The contents match my course goals exceptionally well, which is why I have used this text for many years. No content is insufficiently represented; none are superfluous. The book is both balanced and the right length. . . . The writing is clear, examples are useful, and the focus is behavioral and not some neuro-cognitive-behavioral hybrid. Several features are integrated into the chapters, making the text user-friendly.”

“I have not found any book that comes close to the usefulness of this book”

About the Author

Dr. Russell Powell earned his Ph.D. in psychology under the late Frank Epling and David Pierce at the University of Alberta. As a long-standing faculty member at MacEwan University in Edmonton, Alberta, he has taught classes in learning and behavior for over 30 years using a variety of behaviorally inspired formats.

He has published and conducted research in a wide range of areas, including operant conditioning, social psychology, sleep and dreams (especially nightmares), self-regulation, and history of psychology. Most recently, he helped identify the individual believed to have been Little Albert, the infant in whom Watson and Rayner (1920) attempted to condition a phobia of furry animals (American Psychologist; Powell, Digdon, Harris, and Smithson, 2014).

Lynne Honey — a self-described “evolutionary behaviorist” — completed a Ph.D. in experimental psychology in Jeff Galef’s lab at McMaster University, studying the role of social learning on alcohol consumption in rats. She has published a number of papers on this topic and considers social learning to be one of the most powerful adaptations available to our species and others. Dr. Honey joined the Department of Psychology at MacEwan University in 2003 because of its focus on teaching and student engagement.

She currently conducts research on human social behavior in an evolutionary context, including studies of social dominance, and the influence of personality traits on social behaviors. She also studies the effectiveness of various teaching methods, including peer-review and various uses of technology for learning, and has won an award for innovation in teaching.

Diane Symbaluk received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Alberta in 1997, with a specialization in criminology and social psychology. She joined MacEwan University in 1996 in order to pursue her joint passion for teaching and research mentorship. She has taught courses in a variety of areas including social psychology, criminology, statistics, and research methods. She is presently the faculty advisor for MacEwan University’s Community-Based Sociology Project, a supervised student-led research program.

Her extensive list of publications includes textbooks, journal articles, and more than forty pedagogical resources (e.g., study guides, test banks, instructor manuals, and online resources). A distinguished teaching award winner, Diane is currently conducting research on published student ratings of instruction and character strengths of award-winning instructors.

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