Harrison’s Infectious Diseases, Third Edition

Harrison's Infectious Diseases, Third Edition

Download Harrison’s Infectious Diseases – Harrison’s Infectious Diseases: Featuring a superb compilation of chapters related to infectious diseases derived from Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine, Nineteenth Edition (including content from the acclaimed Harrison’s DVD, now available here in print), this concise, full-color clinical companion delivers the latest knowledge in the field backed by the scientific rigor and authority that have defined Harrison’s

You will find 137 chapters from more than 190 renowned editors and contributors in a carry-anywhere presentation that is ideal for the classroom, clinic, ward, or exam/certification preparation.

Harrison’s Infectious Diseases – Features:

• Current, complete coverage of need-to-know topics, including infections in organ systems, bacterial infections, viral infections, prion diseases, fungal infections, and protozoal infections
• Addresses underlying epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and genetic factors
• Integration of pathophysiology with clinical management
• Includes special update on Zika virus etiology, clinical manifestations, and complications
• The chapter on HIV infections and AIDS by Anthony Fauci and Dr. H. Clifford Lane is widely considered to be a classic in the field
• Two chapters comprise atlases of images that will prove invaluable in clinical assessments
• High-yield board review questions make this text ideal for keeping current and preparing for the boards
• Helpful appendix of laboratory values of clinical importance

From the Back Cover

5 Star Doody’s Review!
“This is a comprehensive infectious diseases book that excels in quality and organization.”
“The authors provide extensive information on the best methodology for diagnosis and treatment of common and rare infectious diseases. They meet their objectives by presenting information in the broader context of underlying epidemiological, pathophysiological, and genetic factors.”
“This encyclopedic work of current infectious disease topics is ideal for aspiring doctors and current clinicians. It would also be an excellent supplemental book for an upper level undergraduate or graduate pathology course. Credible authors provide an authoritative source of current information.” 
“The book uses a full-color format, offering abundant illustrations that provide key information in a readily understandable way. This edition provides updated information crucial for making decisions in management. It is available both in print and as an ebook (offered separately). For those students and ambitious healthcare practitioners who want to test their knowledge, the book ends with a review and self-assessment. This is a comprehensive infectious diseases book that excels in quality and organization.”

Harrison’s Infectious Diseases – Preface

Despite enormous advances in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention during the twentieth century, physicians caring or patients with in ectious diseases today must cope with extraordinary new challenges, including a neverending deluge o new in ormation, the rapid evolution o the microorganisms responsible or these diseases, and ormidable time and cost constraints. In no other area o medicine is the di erential diagnosis so wide, and o en the narrowing o the di erential to a precise in ection caused by a speci c organism with established antimicrobial susceptibilities is a matter o great urgency. o in orm crucial decisions about management, today’s care providers are typically turning to a variety o sources, including both print publications and online services. Our goal in publishing Harrison’s In ectious Diseases as a stand-alone volume is to provide students and practitioners with a single convenient resource that quickly yields accurate, accessible, up-to-date in ormation to meet immediate clinical needs and that presents this in ormation in the broader context o underlying epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and genetic actors. Harrison’s Infectious Diseases

T e authors o the chapters herein are experts in their elds whose points o view represent decades o medical practice and a comprehensive knowledge o the literature. T e speci c recommendations o these authorities regarding diagnostic options and therapeutic regimens—including drugs o choice, doses, durations, and alternatives—take into account not just the trends and concerns o the moment but also the longer-term actors and orces that have shaped present circumstances and will continue to in uence uture developments. Among these orces are the changing prevalences, distributions, eatures, and management alternatives in di erent regions o the world; accordingly, these topics are addressed rom an international perspective Prominent among the 137 chapters in this volume, that on HIV in ections and AIDS by Anthony S. Fauci and H. Cli ord Lane (Chap. 97) is widely considered to be a classic in the eld. Its clinically pragmatic ocus, along with its comprehensive and analytical approach to the pathogenesis o HIV disease, has led to its use as the sole complete re erence on HIV/AIDS in medical schools. Also particularly comprehensive in scope are the classic chapters on tuberculosis (Chap. 74, authored by Mario C. Raviglione) and malaria (Chap. 123, by Nicholas J. White and Joel G. Breman). In a new chapter on Zika virus in ection and associated congenital abnormalities (Chap. 108), David M. Morens and Anthony S. Fauci provide critical in ormation on the history, pandemic spread, pathogenesis, clinical mani estations, and severe congenital complications o Zika. A new chapter by Aaron S. Bernstein on the impact o climate change on in ectious disease (Chap. 8) provides essential in ormation on a topic that has implications or global populations in both the present and the uture.Harrison’s Infectious Diseases

Another new chapter by Andrew W. Artenstein (Chap. 9) tackles timely issues related to in ections in military veterans returning rom oreign wars. T e substantially updated chapter by Je rey I. Gordon and Rob Knight, “T e Human Microbiome” (Chap. 3), summarizes and o ers expert perspective on recent revolutionary in ormation elucidating the intricate, critical relationship o the human body with its trillions o resident microbes and the associated microbial genes. In his updated, highly practical chapter (Chap. 17), Robert A. Weinstein addresses health care–associated in ections, a topic o enormous signi cance in terms o patient care in general and antimicrobial resistance in particular. Harrison’s In ectious Diseases is available both in print and as an eBook obtainable via McGraw-Hill or via the Apple iBookstore. Harrison’s Infectious Diseases

With a ull-color ormat, this volume o ers abundant illustrations that provide key in ormation in a readily understandable ormat. wo chapters comprise atlases o images that can be invaluable in clinical assessments: Chap. 14 presents images o rashes associated with ever, while Chap. 125 shows blood smears o the various stages o the parasites causing malaria and babesiosis. Sel -assessment questions and answers appear a er the appendix at the end o the book T e Editors thank our authors or their hard work in distilling their experience and the relevant literature into this volume, which we hope you will enjoy using as an authoritative source o current in ormation on in ectious diseases.

Table of Contents

Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xi
Pre ace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xix
SECTION I
In t Ro DUCt Io n t o In FeCt Io Us DIs eAs es

  1. Approach to the Patient with an
    In ectious Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
    Neeraj K. Surana, Dennis L. Kasper
  2. Molecular Mechanisms o Microbial
    Pathogenesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
    Gerald B. Pier
  3. T e Human Microbiome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
    Je rey I. Gordon, Rob Knight
  4. Genomics and In ectious Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
    Roby P. Bhattacharyya, Yonatan H. Grad,
    Deborah . Hung
  5. Immunization Principles and Vaccine Use . . . . 48
    Anne Schuchat, Lisa A. Jackson
  6. Health Recommendations or International
    ravel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
    Jay S. Keystone, Phyllis E. Kozarsky
  7. Laboratory Diagnosis o In ectious Diseases . . . . 70
    Alexander J. McAdam, Andrew B. Onderdonk
  8. Climate Change and In ectious Disease . . . . . . . 80
    Aaron S. Bernstein
  9. In ections in Veterans Returning rom
  10. Foreign Wars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
  11. Andrew W. Artenstein
  12. Microbial Bioterrorism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
  13. H. Cli ord Lane, Anthony S. Fauci
  14. SECTION II
  15. FeVeR An D APPRo ACH t o t He FeBRILe
  16. PAt Ien t
  17. Fever . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
  18. Charles A. Dinarello, Reuven Porat
  19. Fever and Rash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
  20. Elaine . Kaye, Kenneth M. Kaye
  21. Fever o Unknown Origin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
  22. Chantal P. Bleeker-Rovers,
  23. Jos W. M. van der Meer
  24. Atlas o Rashes Associated with Fever . . . . . . . 137
  25. Kenneth M. Kaye, Elaine . Kaye
  26. In ections in Patients with Cancer . . . . . . . . . . . 151
  27. Robert W. Finberg
  28. In ections in ransplant Recipients . . . . . . . . . . 162
  29. Robert W. Finberg,Joyce Fingeroth
  30. In ections Acquired in Health
  31. Care Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
  32. Robert A. Weinstein
  33. Approach to the Acutely Ill
  34. In ected Febrile Patient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
  35. amar F. Barlam, Dennis L. Kasper
  36. Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
  37. Robert S. Mun ord
  38. SECTION III
  39. In FeCt Io n s In o RGAn s Ys t eMs
  40. Sore T roat, Earache, and Upper Respiratory
  41. Symptoms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
  42. Michael A. Rubin, Larry C. Ford,
  43. Ralph Gonzales
  44. Pneumonia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
  45. Lionel A. Mandell, Richard G. Wunderink
  46. Lung Abscess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
  47. Rebecca M. Baron, Miriam Baron Barshak
  48. Bronchiectasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
  49. Rebecca M. Baron, Miriam Baron Barshak
  50. In ective Endocarditis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
  51. Adol W. Karchmer
  52. Pericardial Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
  53. Eugene Braunwald
  54. In ections o the Skin,
  55. Muscles, and So issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
  56. Dennis L. Stevens
  57. In ectious Arthritis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
  58. Lawrence C. Mado
  59. Osteomyelitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
  60. Werner Zimmerli
  61. Intraabdominal In ections
  62. and Abscesses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
  63. Miriam Baron Barshak, Dennis L. Kasper
  64. Acute In ectious Diarrheal Diseases
  65. and Bacterial Food Poisoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
  66. Regina C. LaRocque, Edward . Ryan,
  67. Stephen B. Calderwood
  68. Clostridium dif cile Infection,
  69. Including Pseudomembranous Colitis 294
  70. Dale N. Gerding, Stuart Johnson
  71. Acute Appendicitis and Peritonitis . . . . . . . . . . 299
  72. Danny O. Jacobs
  73. Urinary ract In ections,
  74. Pyelonephritis, and Prostatitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
  75. Kalpana Gupta, Barbara W. rautner
  76. Dysuria, Bladder Pain, and the Interstitial
  77. Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
  78. John W. Warren
  79. Sexually ransmitted In ections:
  80. Overview and Clinical Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
  81. Jeanne M. Marrazzo, King K. Holmes
  82. Meningitis, Encephalitis, Brain
  83. Abscess, and Empyema . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
  84. Karen L. Roos, Kenneth L. yler
  85. Chronic and Recurrent Meningitis . . . . . . . . . . 361
  86. Walter J. Koroshetz, Avindra Nath
  87. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
  88. Gijs Bleijenberg,Jos W. M. van der Meer
  89. In ectious Complications
  90. o Burns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371
  91. Lawrence C. Mado , Florencia Pereyra
  92. In ectious Complications
  93. o Bites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
  94. Lawrence C. Mado , Florencia Pereyra
  95. SECTION IV
  96. BACt eRIAL In FeCt Io n s
  97. reatment and Prophylaxis o
  98. Bacterial In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380
  99. David C. Hooper, Erica S. Shenoy,
  100. Christy A. Varughese
  101. Pneumococcal In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400
  102. David Goldblatt, Katherine L. O’Brien
  103. Staphylococcal In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
  104. Franklin D. Lowy
  105. Streptococcal In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
  106. Michael R. Wessels
  107. Enterococcal In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431
  108. Cesar A. Arias, Barbara E. Murray
  109. Acute Rheumatic Fever . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437
  110. Jonathan R. Carapetis
  111. Diphtheria and Other
  112. Corynebacterial In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443
  113. William R. Bishai,John R. Murphy
  114. Listeria monocytogenes Infections 449
  115. Elizabeth L. Hohmann, Daniel A. Portnoy
  116. etanus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452
  117. C. Louise T waites, Lam Minh Yen
  118. Botulism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456
  119. Susan Maslanka, Agam K. Rao
  120. Gas Gangrene and Other Clostridial
  121. In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460
  122. Amy E. Bryant, Dennis L. Stevens
  123. Meningococcal In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 466
  124. Andrew J. Pollard
  125. Gonococcal In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 476
  126. Sanjay Ram, Peter A. Rice
  127. Haemophilus and Moraxella In ections . . . . . . 484
  128. imothy F. Murphy
  129. In ections Due to the HACEK Group and
  130. Miscellaneous Gram-Negative Bacteria . . . . . . 490
  131. amar F. Barlam, Dennis L. Kasper
  132. Legionella In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494
  133. Victor L. Yu, M. Luisa Pedro-Botet, Yusen E. Lin
  134. Pertussis and Other Bordetella Infections 502
  135. Karina A. op, Scott A. Halperin
  136. Diseases Caused by Gram-Negative
  137. Enteric Bacilli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507
  138. T omas A. Russo, James R. Johnson
  139. Acinetobacter Infections 520
  140. David L. Paterson, Anton Y. Peleg
  141. Helicobacter pylori Infections 523
  142. John C. Atherton, Martin J. Blaser
  143. Infections Due to Pseudomonas Species
  144. and Related Organisms 529
  145. Reuben Ramphal
  146. Salmonellosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
  147. David A. Pegues, Samuel I. Miller
  148. Shigellosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 544
  149. Philippe J. Sansonetti,Jean Bergounioux
  150. Infections Due to Campylobacter and Related
  151. Organisms 549
  152. Martin J. Blaser
  153. Cholera and Other Vibrioses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553
  154. Matthew K. Waldor, Edward . Ryan
  155. Brucellosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560
  156. Nicholas J. Beeching, Michael J. Corbel
  157. ularemia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565
  158. Richard F. Jacobs, Gordon E. Schutze
  159. Plague and Other Yersinia Infections 570
  160. Michael B. Prentice
  161. Bartonella Infections, Including
  162. Cat-Scratch Disease 580
  163. Michael Giladi, Moshe Ephros
  164. Donovanosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 587
  165. Nigel O’Farrell
  166. Nocardiosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 589
  167. Gregory A. Filice
  168. Actinomycosis and Whipple’s Disease . . . . . . . 594
  169. T omas A. Russo
  170. In ections Due to Mixed
  171. Anaerobic Organisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 602
  172. Ronit Cohen-Poradosu, Dennis L. Kasper
  173. uberculosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 612
  174. Mario C. Raviglione
  175. Leprosy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 635
  176. Robert H. Gelber
  177. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial In ections . . . . 643
  178. Steven M. Holland
  179. Antimycobacterial Agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 648
  180. Max R. O’Donnell, Divya Reddy,
  181. Jussi J. Saukkonen
  182. Syphilis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 658
  183. Sheila A. Lukehart
  184. Endemic reponematoses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 668
  185. Sheila A. Lukehart
  186. Leptospirosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 672
  187. Rudy A. Hartskeerl,Jiři F. P. Wagenaar
  188. Relapsing Fever . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678
  189. Alan G. Barbour
  190. Lyme Borreliosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 682
  191. Allen C. Steere
  192. Rickettsial Diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 688
  193. David H. Walker,J. Stephen Dumler,
  194. T omas Marrie
  195. In ections Due to Mycoplasmas . . . . . . . . . . . . . 699
  196. R. Doug Hardy
  197. Chlamydial In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703
  198. Charlotte A. Gaydos, T omas C. Quinn
  199. SECTION V
  200. VIRAL In FeCt Io n s
  201. Medical Virology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714
  202. Fred Wang, Elliott Kie
  203. Antiviral Chemotherapy,
  204. Excluding Antiretroviral Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 725
  205. Lindsey R. Baden, Raphael Dolin
  206. Herpes Simplex Virus In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . 737
  207. Lawrence Corey
  208. Varicella-Zoster Virus In ections . . . . . . . . . . . 747
  209. Richard J. Whitley
  210. Epstein-Barr Virus In ections,
  211. Including In ectious Mononucleosis. . . . . . .752
  212. Je rey I. Cohen
  213. Cytomegalovirus and Human
  214. Herpesvirus ypes 6, 7, and 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 757
  215. Camille Nelson Kotton, Martin S. Hirsch
  216. Molluscum Contagiosum, Monkeypox,
  217. and Other Poxvirus In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 762
  218. Fred Wang
  219. Parvovirus In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 764
  220. Kevin E. Brown
  221. Human Papillomavirus In ections. . . . . . . . . . . 768
  222. Aaron C. Ermel, Darron R. Brown
  223. Common Viral Respiratory In ections . . . . . . . 774
  224. Raphael Dolin
  225. In uenza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 783
  226. Yehuda Z. Cohen, Raphael Dolin
  227. Human Immunode ciency Virus
  228. Disease: AIDS and Related Disorders . . . . . . . . 790
  229. Anthony S. Fauci, H. Cli ord Lane
  230. Viral Gastroenteritis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 870
  231. Umesh D. Parashar, Roger I. Glass
  232. Acute Viral Hepatitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 876
  233. Jules L. Dienstag
  234. Chronic Hepatitis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 898
  235. Jules L. Dienstag
  236. Enterovirus, Parechovirus, and
  237. Reovirus In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 922
  238. Je rey I. Cohen
  239. Measles (Rubeola) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 929
  240. Kaitlin Rainwater-Lovett, William J. Moss
  241. Rubella (German Measles) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 934
  242. Laura A. Zimmerman, Susan E. Ree
  243. Mumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 938
  244. Steven A. Rubin, Kathryn M. Carbone
  245. Rabies and Other Rhabdovirus In ections . . . . 943
  246. Alan C. Jackson
  247. Arthropod-Borne and Rodent-Borne
  248. Virus In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949
  249. Jens H. Kuhn, Clarence J. Peters
  250. Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus In ections . . . . . 971
  251. Jens H. Kuhn
  252. Zika Virus In ection and Zika-Associated
  253. Congenital Abnormalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 978
  254. David M. Morens, Anthony S. Fauci
  255. SECTION VI
  256. PRIo n DIs eAs es
  257. Prion Diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 984
  258. Stanley B. Prusiner, Bruce L. Miller
  259. SECTION VII
  260. FUn GAL In FeCt Io n s
  261. Diagnosis and reatment o
  262. Fungal In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 992
  263. John E. Edwards, Jr.
  264. Histoplasmosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 996
  265. Chadi A. Hage, L. Joseph Wheat
  266. Coccidioidomycosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1000
  267. Neil M. Ampel
  268. Blastomycosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1004
  269. Donna C. Sullivan, Rathel L. Nolan, III
  270. Cryptococcosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1007
  271. Arturo Casadevall
  272. Candidiasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1010
  273. John E. Edwards, Jr.
  274. Aspergillosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1014
  275. David W. Denning
  276. Mucormycosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1020
  277. Brad Spellberg, Ashra S. Ibrahim
  278. Super cial Mycoses and Less Common
  279. Systemic Mycoses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1025
  280. Carol A. Kau man
  281. Pneumocystis Infections 1032
  282. Henry Masur, Alison Morris
  283. Laboratory Diagnosis o Parasitic
  284. In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1038
  285. Sharon L. Reed, Charles E. Davis
  286. Agents Used to reat Parasitic In ections . . . .1046
  287. T omas A. Moore
  288. Amebiasis and In ection with
  289. Free-Living Amebas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1062
  290. Rosa M. Andrade, Sharon L. Reed
  291. Malaria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1069
  292. Nicholas J. White,Joel G. Breman
  293. Babesiosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1088
  294. Edouard G. Vannier, Peter J. Krause
  295. Atlas o Blood Smears o Malaria
  296. and Babesiosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1092
  297. Nicholas J. White,Joel G. Breman
  298. Leishmaniasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1096
  299. Shyam Sundar
  300. Chagas Disease and A rican
  301. rypanosomiasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1104
  302. Louis V. Kirchho , Anis Rassi, Jr.
  303. oxoplasma Infections 1110
  304. Kami Kim, Lloyd H. Kasper
  305. Protozoal Intestinal In ections
  306. and richomoniasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1118
  307. Peter F. Weller
  308. Introduction to Helminthic In ections . . . . . . 1124
  309. Peter F. Weller
  310. richinellosis and Other issue
  311. Nematode In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1126
  312. Peter F. Weller
  313. Intestinal Nematode In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . 1131
  314. Peter F. Weller, T omas B. Nutman
  315. Filarial and Related In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1137
  316. T omas B. Nutman, Peter F. Weller
  317. Schistosomiasis and Other
  318. rematode In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1145
  319. Charles H. King, Adel A. F. Mahmoud
  320. Cestode In ections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1153
  321. A. Clinton White, Jr., Peter F. Weller
  322. SECTION IX
  323. en Ven o MAt Io n s , In Fes t At Io n s , BIt es ,
  324. An D s t In Gs
  325. Disorders Caused by Venomous Snakebites and
  326. Marine Animal Exposures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1162
  327. Charles Lei, Natalie J. Badowski,
  328. Paul S. Auerbach, Robert L. Norris
  329. Ectoparasite In estations and
  330. Arthropod Injuries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1175
  331. Richard J. Pollack, Scott A. Norton
  332. Appendix
  333. Laboratory Values o Clinical Importance . . . . . . . . 1183
  334. Alexander Kratz, Michael A. Pesce,
  335. Robert C. Basner, Andrew J. Einstein
  336. Review and Sel -Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1205
  337. Charles M. Wiener, Cynthia D. Brown,
  338. Brian Houston
  339. Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1245

About the Author

Dennis Kasper, MD (Boston, MA) is Channing Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

Anthony S. Fauci, MD (Bethesda, MD) is Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.

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