Download Fundamentals of Applied Electromagnetics PDF

Fundamentals of Applied Electromagnetics 6th Edition PDF

Fundamentals of Applied Electromagnetics is intended for use in one- or two-semester courses in electromagnetics. It also serves as a reference for engineers.

Widely acclaimed both in the U.S. and abroad, this authoritative text bridges the gap between circuits and new electromagnetics material. Ulaby begins coverage with transmission lines, leading students from familiar concepts into more advanced topics and applications. A user-friendly approach, full-color figures and images, and a set of interactive simulations will help readers understand the concepts presented.

About the Author – Fundamentals of Applied Electromagnetics

Fawwaz Ulaby 
Since joining the University of Michigan faculty in 1984, Professor Ulaby has directed numerous interdisciplinary projects aimed at the development of high-resolution satellite radar sensors for mapping Earth’s terrestrial environment. He also served as the founding director of the NASA-funded Center for Space Terahertz Technology, whose research was aimed at the development of microelectronic devices and circuits that operate at wavelengths between the infrared and the microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. He then served a seven-year term as the University of Michigan’s vice president for research from 1999-2005. Over his academic career, he has published 10 books and supervised more than 100 graduate students. 


 
Umberto Ravaioli
Professor Ravaioli attended the University of Bologna, Italy, where he obtained degrees in Electronics Engineering and Physics. He conducted his dissertation work on fiber optics and microwaves at the laboratories of the Marconi Foundation in Villa Griffone, the summer estate where Guglielmo Marconi performed his first radio experiments. After developing interests in high speed semiconductor devices and large scale computation, he pursued a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at Arizona State University, where he developed Monte Carlo particle simulations for the high electron mobility transistor. 

He joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1986. He was a co-founder of the National Center for Computational Electronics, which promoted for over a decade the development of large scale device simulation by leveraging resources at national supercomputing centers.

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