Download Obstetrics and Gynaecology by Lawrence and Tim

Obstetrics and Gynaecology PDF

Obstetrics and Gynaecology by Impey and Child continues to be an invaluable and authoritative resource for healthcare and medical students. This comprehensive guide provides the perfect level of detail on history and examination, investigations and diagnosis, as well as common diseases, abnormalities, and complications in gynaecology and obstetrics.

Fully updated in accordance with NICE and other national guidelines, this fifth edition now includes:

  • New sections on FGM and influenza
  • Expanded areas in medical disorders in pregnancy and mental illness
  • Improvements to the popular ‘management’ section along with a new section on sepsis
  • Colour coded sections on obstetrics and gynaecology for ease of use

This new edition of Obstetrics and Gynaecology will be an indispensable support to help not only students to revise for exams, especially OSCEs, but also healthcare practitioners and practising doctors to structure their knowledge and improve their practice.

Review – Obstetrics and Gynaecology

“Overall, this textbook is a useful resource for medical students who are being exposed to obstetrics and gynaecology for the first time.” (“Times Higher Education, ” 28 February 2013)

From the Back Cover

Praise for the previous edition:

“… this textbook is a useful resource for medical students … it will provide them with the basic information they need to survive clinics and to pass exams … Clear, concise and colourful; perfect for easy learning and revision.”
Times Higher Education

Obstetrics & Gynaecology by Impey and Child continues to be an invaluable and authoritative resource for healthcare and medical students. This comprehensive guide provides the perfect level of detail on history and examination, investigations and diagnosis, as well as common diseases, abnormalities, and complications in gynaecology and obstetrics.

Fully updated in accordance with NICE and other national guidelines, this fifth edition now includes:

  • New sections on FGM, influenza and sepsis
  • Expanded areas in medical disorders in pregnancy and mental illness
  • Improvements to the popular ‘management’ section
  • Colour-coded sections on obstetrics and gynaecology for ease of use

This new edition of Obstetrics & Gynaecology will be an indispensable support to help not only students to revise for exams, especially OSCEs, but also healthcare practitioners and practising doctors to structure their knowledge and improve their practice.

Obstetrics & Gynaecology is also supported by a companion website at www.impeyobgyn.com featuring:

  • Downloadable illustrations from the book
  • Interactive MCQs and EMQs
  • Downloadable revision notes to facilitate learning

For more information on the complete range of Wiley medical student and junior doctor publishing, please visit: www.wileymedicaleducation.com Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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This title is also available as an e-book. For more details, please see www.wiley.com/buy/9781119010791

Content – Obstetrics and Gynaecology

GYNAECOLOGY

1 The history and examination in gynaecology
2 The menstrual cycle and its disorders
3 The uterus and its abnormalities
4 The cervix and its disorders
5 The ovary and its disorders
6 Disorders of the vulva and vagina
7 Prolapse of the uterus and vagina
8 Disorders of the urinary tract
9 Endometriosis and chronic pelvic pain
10 Genital tract infections
11 Fertility and subfertility
12 Contraception
13 The menopause and postreproductive health
14 Disorders of early pregnancy
15 Gynaecological operations.

OBSTETRICS

16 The history and examination in obstetrics
17 Antenatal care
18 Congenital abnormalities and their identification
19 Infections in pregnancy
20 Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy
21 Other medical disorders in pregnancy
22 Red blood cell isoimmunization
23 Delivery before term
24 Antepartum haemorrhage
25 Fetal growth, health and surveillance
26 Abnormal lie and breech presentation
27 Multiple pregnancies
28 Labour 1: Mechanism – anatomy and physiology
29 Labour 2: Management
30 Labour 3: Special circumstances
31 Instrumental and operative delivery
32 Obstetric emergencies
33 The puerperium
34 Birth statistics and audit
35 Legal (UK) and ethical issues in obstetrics and gynaecology.

Features – Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Here are important features of this book:

  • New sections on FGM and influenza
  • Expanded areas in medical disorders in pregnancy and mental illness
  • Improvements to the popular ‘management’ section along with a new section on sepsis
  • Colour-coded sections on obstetrics and gynaecology for ease of use

This new edition of Obstetrics and Gynaecology will be an indispensable support to help not on students to revise for exams, especially OSCEs, but also healthcare practitioners and practising doctors to structure their knowledge and improve their practice. Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Preface – Obstetrics and Gynaecology

In this 5th edition, we hold to the same principles as the first: to be concise with words not facts, with the emphasis on clarity, principles of management and easy access to the information. However, the text has been completely updated to reflect new information and practice. This book is primarily meant to help medical students pass and even do really well in their exams, but its clarity and emphasis on management should also prove useful to practising doctors to structure their knowledge and improve their practice. Lawrence Impey Tim Child 2016 Obstetrics and Gynaecology

This book is written for the UK medical student, in line with changes in medical education and the advent of the core curriculum. The level of information is enough to allow a high mark in the final obstetrics and gynaecology examinations. But its strong emphasis on management should also be useful for practising doctors and those about to take postgraduate examinations. As a student and then a lecturer, I was always surprised at the deficiencies of many textbooks: how they failed to emphasize what was common or important, how little emphasis they placed on ‘what to do’ in a real situation, and how little they allowed understanding of the subject. Problem-based learning is in part a backlash against this. Yet there remains a need for a comprehensive yet straightforward textbook. In this, the space given to each topic reflects its importance. The information is up to date, evidence based where possible, and referenced, at least for important, new or contentious issues. At the end of each chapter, summaries of all the major topics should aid revision and prevent the need for a separate revision text. At the end of the book, separate management sections describe what to do in all the common clinical situations, from the management of slow progress in labour to the management of the subfertile couple.

Specific gynaecological questions

These are asked next, starting with ones that are relevant to this presenting complaint. For example, if it is a menstrual problem, the most appropriate next questions concern menstruation; if it is a urinary problem, one should ask all the appropriate urinary tract questions next. Menstrual questions: How often does she menstruate (how many days from the first day of bleeding to the next first day?) and how long does menstruation last? (4/28 means bleeding lasts for 4 days and occurs every 28 days.) Is it regular or irregular? Is it heavy? (Number of pads/tampons used or the presence of clots can be useful.)

Is it or the days leading up to it painful? Is there ever intermenstrual bleeding (IMB)? Is there ever postcoital bleeding (PCB)? Is there ever vaginal discharge and, if so, what is it like? Does she experience premenstrual tension? When was her last menstrual period (LMP)? If postmenopausal, has there been postmenopausal bleeding (PMB)? Sexual/contraceptive questions: Is she sexually active? If so, is it painful? If so, is it on penetration (superficial dyspareunia) or deep inside (deep dyspareunia) and is it during and/or after (delayed)? What contraceptive (if appropriate) does she use and what has she used in the past?

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