Download Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines by Rajput

Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic by Rajput

Download Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines free PDF by Rajput. Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines covers completely the syllabi of B.Tech./B.E. Courses of various technical universities of India. It will also prove to be of immense use to the students preparing for various Competitive examinations (GATE, UPSC, etc.)

Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines PDF

Fluid mechanics is a branch of physics concerned with the mechanics of fluids (liquids, gases, and plasmas) and the forces on them. Fluid mechanics has a wide range of applications, including mechanical engineering, civil engineering, chemical engineering, biomedical engineering, geophysics, astrophysics, and biology. Fluid mechanics can be divided into fluid statics, the study of fluids at rest; and fluid dynamics, the study of the effect of forces on fluid motion. It is a branch of continuum mechanics, a subject which models matter without using the information that it is made out of atoms; that is, it models matter from a macroscopic viewpoint rather than from microscopic. Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines PDF

Fluid mechanics, especially fluid dynamics, is an active field of research with many problems that are partly or wholly unsolved. Fluid mechanics can be mathematically complex, and can best be solved by numerical methods, typically using computers. A modern discipline, called computational fluid dynamics (CFD), is devoted to this approach to solving fluid mechanics problems. Particle image velocimetry, an experimental method for visualizing and analyzing fluid flow, also takes advantage of the highly visual nature of fluid flow. Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines

Hydraulic machines are machinery and tools that use liquid fluid power to do simple work. Heavy equipment is a common example.

In this type of machine, hydraulic fluid is transmitted throughout the machine to various hydraulic motors and hydraulic cylinders and becomes pressurised according to the resistance present. The fluid is controlled directly or automatically by control valves and distributed through hoses and tubes.

The popularity of hydraulic machinery is due to the very large amount of power that can be transferred through small tubes and flexible hoses, and the high power density and wide array of actuators that can make use of this power. Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines

Hydraulic machinery is operated by the use of hydraulics, where a liquid is the powering medium

The entire book has been throughly revised by adding adequate text and a large number of typical examples selected from various universities and competitive examinations question papers.Besides this, Laboratory Experiments have also been added at the end of the book to make it still more a comprehensive and complete unit in all respects

Preface – Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines

The main object of writing this book on the subject of Fluid Mechanics and HydraulicMachines is to present to the student community, a book which should contain compre-hensive treatment of the subject matter in simple, lucid and direct language and envelopea large number of solved problems properly graded, including typical examples, fromexamination point of view.The book comprises 22 chapters and is divided into two parts: Part I deals with ‘Fluid Mechanics’ while Part II deals with ‘Hydraulic Machines’ (Fluid Power Engineering). Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines

Allchapters of the book are saturated with much needed text supported by simple and self-explanatory gures and large number ofWorked ExamplesincludingTypical Examples(forcompetitive examinations). At the end of each chapterHighlights, Objective Type Questions,Theoretical QuestionsandUnsolved Examples have been added to make the book a compre-hensive and a complete unit in all respects.The book will prove to be a boon to the students preparing for engineering under-graduate, AMIE Section B (India) and competitive examinations.Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines PDF

The author’s thanks are due to his wife Ramesh Rajput for extending all cooperationduring preparation of the manuscript.In the end the author wishes to express his gratitude to Shri Ravindra Kumar Gupta,Director, S. Chand & Company Ltd., New Delhi, for taking a lot of pains in bringing outthe book, with extremely good presentation, in a short span of time.Although every care has been taken to make the book free of errors both in the text aswell as solved examples, yet the author shall feel obliged if errors present are brought tohis notice. Constructive criticism of the book will be warmly received. Er. R.K. Rajput(Author) 

Table of Content – Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines PDF

Part-I: Fluid Mechanics
• Properties of Fluids • Pressure Measurement • Hydrostatic Forces on Surfaces • Buoyancy and Floatation • Fluid Kinematics • Fluid Dynamics • Dimensional and Model Analysis • Flow through Orifices and Mouthpieces • Flow Over Notches and Weirs • Laminar Flow • Turbulent Flow in Pipes • Flow through Pipes • Boundary Layer Theory • Flow around Submerged Bodies—Drag and Lift • Compressible Flow • Flow in Open Channels • Universities’ Questions (Latest) with “Solutions” • ”GATE” AND ”UPSC” Examinations’ Questions with Answers/Solutions (Latest-Selected) • Laboratory Practicals

Part-II: Hydraulic Machines
• Impact of Free Jets • Hydraulic Turbines • Centrifugal Pumps • Reciprocating Pumps • Miscellaneous Hydraulic Machines • Water Power Development • Fluidics • Universities’ Questions (Latest) with “Solutions” • ”GATE” and ”UPSC” Examinations’ Questions with Answers/Solutions (Latest-Selected) • Laboratory Practicals

Detailed Content – Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines PDF

  1. PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS 1–42

1.1. Introduction 1 1.2. Fluid 2 1.3. Liquids and their Properties 3 1.4. Density 3 1.4.1. Mass density 3 1.4.2. Weight density 3
1.4.3. Specic volume 3 1.5. Specic Gravity 3
1.6. Viscosity 4 1.6.1. Newton’s law of viscosity 5
1.6.2. Types of uids 5
1.6.3. Effect of temperature on viscosity 8 1.6.4. Effect of pressure on viscosity 8 1.7. Thermodynamic Properties 23 1.8. Surface Tension and Capillarity 25 1.8.1. Surface tension 25 1.8.1.1. Pressure inside a water droplet, soap bubbleand a liquid jet 26 1.8.2. Capillarity 28 1.9. Compressibility and Bulk Modulus 34 1.10. Vapour Pressure 37 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines
Highlights
39
Objective Type Questions
40
Theoretical Questions
41
Unsolved Examples
41

  1. PRESSURE MEASUREMENT 43—96
    2.1. Pressure of a Liquid 43 2.2. Pressure Head of a Liquid 432.3. Pascal’s Law 452.4. Absolute and Gauge Pressures 48 2.5. Measurement of Pressure 53 2.5.1. Manometers 54 2.5.1.1. Simple manometers 54 2.5.1.2. Differential manometers 63 2.5.1.3. Advantages and limitations of manometers 81 2.5.2. Mechanical gauges 81 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines

2.6. Pressure at a Point in Compressible Fluid 83
Highlights
91
Objective Type Questions
92
Theoretical Questions
93
Unsolved Examples
93

  1. HYDROSTATIC FORCES ON SURFACES 97—159
    3.1. Introduction 97 3.2. Total Pressure and Centre of Pressure 97 3.3. Horizontally Immersed Surface 97 3.4. Vertically Immersed Surface 98 3.5. Inclined Immersed Surface 116 3.6. Curved Immersed Surface 129 3.7. Dams 140 3.8. Possibilities of Dam Failure 142 3.9. Lock Gates 151
    Highlights
    155
    Objective Type Questions Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines
    156
    Theoretical Questions
    157
    Unsolved Examples
    157
  2. BUOYANCY AND FLOATATION 160—191
    4.1. Buoyancy 160 4.2. Centre of Buoyancy 160 4.2. Types of Equilibrium of Floating Bodies 165 4.3.1. Stable equilibrium 165 4.3.2. Unstable equilibrium 165 4.3.3. Neutral equilibrium 165 4.4. Metacentre and Metacentric Height 165 4.5. Determination of Metacentric Height 166 4.5.1. Analytical method 166 4.5.2. Experimental method 167 4.6. Oscillation (Rolling of a Floating Body) 187
    Highlights
    189
    Objective Type Questions
    189
    Theoretical Questions
    190
    Unsolved Examples
    190
  3. FLUID KINEMATICS 192—258
    5.1. Introduction 192
    5.2.
    Description of Fluid Motion 192 5.2.1. Langrangian method 192 5.2.2. Eulerian method 193 5.3. Types of Fluid Flow 195 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines

5.3.1. Steady and unsteady ows 195 5.3.2. Uniform and non-uniform ows 196 5.3.3. One, two and three dimensional ows 196 5.3.4. Rotational and irrotational ows 197 5.3.5. Laminar and turbulent ows 197 5.3.6. Compressible and incompressible ows 197
5.4. Types of Flow Lines 198 5.4.1. Path line 198 5.4.2. Stream line 198 5.4.3. Stream tube 198 5.4.4. Streak line 199 5.5. Rate of Flow or Discharge 207 5.6. Continuity Equation 207 5.7. Continuity Equation in Cartesian Co-ordinates 209 5.8. Equation of Continuity in Polar Coordinates 211 5.9. Circulation and Vorticity 218 5.10. Velocity Potential and Stream Function 227 5.10.1. Velocity potential 227 5.10.2. Stream function 228 5.10.3. Relation between stream function and velocity potential 231 5.11. Flow Nets 231
5.11.1. Methods of drawing ow nets 231 5.11.2. Uses and limitations of ow nets 232

Highlights Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines
253
Objective Type Questions
255
Theoretical Questions
257
Unsolved Examples
257

  1. FLUID DYNAMICS 259—385
    6.1. Introduction 259 6.2. Different Types of Heads (or Energies) of a Liquid in Motion 259 6.3. Bernoulli’s Equation 260 6.4. Euler’s Equation for Motion 262 6.5. Bernoulli’s Equation for Real Fluid 276 6.6. Practical Applications of Bernoulli’s Equation 291 6.6.1. Venturimeter 291 6.6.1.1. Horizontal venturimeters 292 6.6.1.2. Vertical and inclined venturimeters 298
    6.6.2. Oricemeter 303
    6.6.3. Rotameter and elbow meter 308 6.6.3.1. Rotameter 308 6.6.3.2. Elbow meter 309 6.6.4. Pitot Tube 310 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines

6.7. Free Liquid Jet 313 6.8. Impulse-Momentum Equation 320
6.9. Kinetic Energy and Momentum Correction Factors (Coriolis Co-efcients) 336
6.10. Moment of Momentum Equation 343 6.11. Vortex Motion 345
6.11.1. Forced vortex ow 345 6.11.2. Free vortex ow 346 6.11.3. Equation of motion for vortex ow 346 6.11.4. Equation of forced vortex ow 347
6.11.5. Rotation of liquid in a closed cylindrical vessel 354
6.11.6. Equation of free vortex ow 361
6.12. Liquids in Relative Equilibrium 364 6.12.1. Liquid in a container subjected to uniform acceleration in thehorizontal direction 364 6.12.2. Liquid in a container subjected to uniform acceleration in thevertical direction 373 6.12.3. Liquid in container subjected to uniform acceleation alonginclined plane 375 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines
Highlights
376
Objective Type Questions
379
Theoretical Questions
381
Unsolved Examples
382

  1. DIMENSIONAL AND MODEL ANALYSIS 386—456

DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS
7.1. Dimensional Analysis—Introduction 386 7.2. Dimensions 387 7.3. Dimensional Homogeneity 389 7.4. Methods of Dimensional Analysis 390 7.4.1. Rayleigh’s method 390
7.4.2. Buckingham’s π-method/theorem 394 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines
7.4.3. Limitations of dimensional analysis 415
MODEL ANALYSIS
7.5. Model Analysis—Introduction 415 7.6. Similitude 416 7.7. Forces Influencing Hydraulic Phenomena 417 7.8. Dimensionless Numbers and their Significance 418 7.8.1. Reynolds number (
Re
) 418 7.8.2. Froude’s number (
Fr
) 419 7.8.3. Euler’s number (
Eu
) 419 7.8.4. Weber number (
We
) 419 7.8.5. Mach number (
M
) 420 7.9. Model (or Similarity) Laws 420 7.10. Reynolds Model Law 420 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines

7.11. Froude Model Law 434 7.12. Euler Model Law 445 7.13. Weber Model Law 446 7.14. Mach Model Law 447 7.15. Types of Models 449 7.15.1. Undistorted models 449 7.15.2. Distorted models 449 7.16. Scale Effect in Models 450 7.17. Limitations of Hydraulic Similitude 451
Highlights
451
Objective Type Questions
453
Theoretical Questions
454
Unsolved Examples
454

  1. FLOW THROUGH ORIFICES AND MOUTHPIECES 457—507
    8.1. Introduction 457 8.2. Classification of Orifices 457 8.3. Flow Through an Orifice 458 8.4. Hydraulic Co-efficients 458 8.4.1. Co-efficient of contraction (C
    c
    ) 458 8.4.2. Co-efficient of velocity (C Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines
    v
    ) 459 8.4.3. Co-efficient of discharge 459 8.4.4. Co-efficient of resistance (C
    r
    ) 459 8.4. Experimental Determination of Hydraulic Co-efficients 460 8.5.1. Determination of co-efficient of velocity (C
    v
    ). 460 8.5.2. Determination of co-efficient of discharge (C
    d
    ) 461 8.5.3. Determination of co-efficient of contraction (C
    c
    ) 462 8.5.4. Loss of head in orifice flow 462 8.6. Discharge Through a Large Rectangular Orifice 470 8.7. Discharge Through Fully Submerged Orifice 472 8.8. Discharge Through Partially Submerged Orifice 473 8.9. Time Required for Emptying a Tank Through an Orifice at its Bottom 474 8.10. Time Required for Emptying a Hemispherical Tank 483 8.11. Time Required for Emptying a Circular Horizontal Tank 487 8.12. Classification of Mouthpieces 490 8.13. Discharge Through an External Mouthpiece 490 8.14. Discharge Through a Convergent-divergent Mouthpiece 493 8.15. Discharge Through an Internal Mouthpiece (or Re-entrant or Borda’sMouthpiece) 496 8.15.1. Mouthpiece running free 496 8.15.2. Mouthpiece running full 497
    Highlights
    503
    Objective Type Questions Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines
    505

heoretical Questions
506
Unsolved Examples
506

  1. FLOW OVER NOTCHES AND WEIRS 508—533
    9.1. Definitions 508 9.2. Types/Classification of Notches and Weirs 508 9·2·1. Types of notches 508 9·2·2. Types of weirs 509 9.3. Discharge Over a Rectangular Notch or Weir 509 9.4. Discharge Over a Triangular Notch or Weir 511 9.5. Discharge Over a Trapezoidal Notch or Weir 513 9.6. Discharge Over a Stepped Notch 514 9.7. Effect on Discharge Over a Notch or Weir due to Error in theMeasurement of Head 516 9.8. Velocity of Approach 518 9.9. Empirical Formulae for Discharge Over Rectangular Weir 518 9.10. Cippoletti Weir or Notch 521 9.11. Discharge Over a Broad Crested Weir 522 9.12. Discharge Over a Narrow-crested Weir 523 9.13. Discharge Over an Ogee Weir 523 9.14. Discharge Over Submerged or Drowned Weir 523 9.15. Time Required to empty a Reservoir or a Tank with Rectangular and TriangularWeirs or Notches 526
    Highlights Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines
    528
    Objective Type Questions
    530
    Theoretical Questions
    532
    Unsolved Examples
    533
  2. LAMINAR FLOW 534—604
    10.1. Introduction 534 10.2. Reynolds Experiment 535 10.3. Navier-Stokes Equations of Motion 537 10.4. Relationship between Shear Stress and Pressure Gradient 540 10.5. Flow of Viscous Fluid in Circular Pipes—Hagen Poiseuille Law 541 10.6. Flow of Viscous Fluid through an Annulus 567 10.7. Flow of Viscous Fluid Between Two Parallel Plates 570 10.7.1. One plate moving and other at rest—couette flow 570 10.7.2. Both plates at rest 572 10.7.3. Both plates moving in opposite directions 572 10.8. Laminar Flow through Porous Media 582 10.9. Power Absorbed in Bearings 583 10.9.1. Journal bearing 583 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines

10.9.2. Foot-step bearing 585 10.9.3. Collar bearing 586
10.10. Loss of Head due to Friction in Viscous ow 587
10.11. Movement of Piston in Dashpot 589 10.12. Measurement of Viscosity 591 10.12.1. Rotating cylinder method 591 10.12.2. Falling sphere method 594 10.12.3. Capillary tube method 595 10.12.4. Efflux Viscometers 597
Highlights
597
Objective Type Questions
601
Theoretical Questions
602
Unsolved Examples
602

  1. TURBULENT FLOW IN PIPES 605—637
    11.1. Introduction 605 11.2. Loss of Head due to Friction in Pipe Flow–Darcy Equation 606 11.3. Characteristics of Turbulent Flow 608 11.4. Shear Stresses in Turbulent Flow 609 11·4·1. Boussinesq’s theory 609 11·4·2. Reynolds theory 610 11·4·3. Prandtl’s mixing length theory 610 11.5. Universal Velocity Distribution Equation 610 11.6. Hydrodynamically Smooth and Rough Boundaries 612 11·6·1. Velocity distribution for turbulent flow in smooth pipes 613 11·6·2. Velocity distribution for turbulent flow in rough pipes 615 11.7. Common Equation for Velocity Distribution for both Smooth and Rough Pipes 618 11.8. Velocity Distribution for Turbulent Flow in Smooth Pipes by Power Law 620 11.9.
    Resistance to Flow of Fluid in Smooth and Rough Pipes
    621
    Highlights
    633
    Objective Type Questions
    635
    Theoretical Questions
    636
    Unsolved Examples
    637
  2. FLOW THROUGH PIPES 638—724
    12.1. Introduction 638 12.2. Loss of Energy (or Head) in Pipes 638 12.3. Major Energy Losses 638 12·3·1. Darcy-weisbach formula 639 12·3·2. Chezy’s formula for loss of head due to friction 639 12.4. Minor Energy Losses 645

12·4·1. Loss of head due to sudden enlargement 645 12·4·2. Loss of head due to sudden contraction 652 12·4·3. Loss of head due to obstruction in pipe 656 12·4·4. Loss of head at the entrance to pipe 657 12·4·5. Loss of head at the exit of a pipe 657 12·4·6. Loss of head due to bend in the pipe 657 12·4·7. Loss of head in various Pipe Fittings 657 12.5. Hydraulic Gradient and Total Energy Lines 657 12.6. Pipes in Series or Compound Pipes 668 12.7. Equivalent Pipe 671 12.8. Pipes in Parallel 674 12.9. Syphon 699 12.10. Power Transmission through Pipes 703 12.11. Flow through Nozzle at the End of a Pipe 706 12·11·1. Power transmitted through the nozzle 707 12·11·2. Condition for transmission of maximum power through nozzle 707 12·11·3. Diameter of the nozzle for transmitting maximum power 708 12.12. Water Hammer in Pipes 711 12·12·1. Gradual closure of valve 711 12·12·2. Instantaneous closure of valve in rigid pipes 712 12·12·3. Instantaneous closure of valve in elastic pipes 713 12·12·4. Time required by pressure wave to travel from the valve to the tankand from tank to valve 714
Highlights
716
Objective Type Questions
719
Theoretical Questions
721
Unsolved Examples
721

  1. BOUNDARY LAYER THEORY 725—784
    13.1. Introduction 725 13.2. Boundary Layer Definitions and Characteristics 726 13.2.1. Boundary layer thickness (
    δ
    ) 727 13.2.2. Displacement thickness (
    δ
    *
    ) 727 13.2.3. Momentum thickness (
    θ
    ) 728 13.2.4. Energy thickness (
    δ
    e
    ) 729 13.3. Momentum Equation for Boundary Layer by Von Karman 739 13.4. Laminar Boundary Layer 742 13.5. Turbulent Boundary Layer 766 13.6. Total Drag due to Laminar and Turbulent Layers 769 13.7. Boundary Layer Separation and its Control 774
    Highlights
    778
    Objective Type Questions
    780
    Theoretical Questions
    782
    Unsolved Examples
    782
  1. FLOW AROUND SUBMERGED BODIES—DRAG AND LIFT 785—824
    14.1. Introduction 785 14.2. Force Exerted by a Flowing Fluid on a Body 785 14.3. Expressions for Drag and Lift 786 14.4. Dimensional Analysis of Drag and Lift 788 14.5. Streamlined and Bluff Bodies 798 14.6. Drag on a Sphere 798 14.6.1. Terminal velocity of a body 799 14.6.2. Applications of stokes’ law 800 14.7. Drag on a Cylinder 804 14.8. Circulation and Lift on a Circular Cylinder 804 14.8.1. Flow patterns and development of lift 804 14.8.2. Position of stagnation points 806 14.8.3. Pressure at any point on the cylinder surface 807 14.8.4. Expression for lift on cylinder (kutta- joukowski theorem) 807 14.8.5. Expression for lift coefficient for rotating cylinder 809 14.8.6. Magnus effect 810 14.9. Lift on an Airfoil 815
    Highlights
    818
    Objective Type Questions
    820
    Theoretical Questions
    822
    Unsolved Examples
    823
  2. COMPRESSIBLE FLOW 825—879
    15.1. Introduction 825 15.2. Basic Thermodynamic Relations 825 15.2.1. The characteristics equation of state 825 15.2.2. Specific heats 826 15.2.3. Internal energy 826 15.2.4. Enthalpy 827 15.2.5. Energy, work and heat 827 15.3. Basic Thermodynamic Processes 827 15.4. Basic Equations of Compressible Fluid Flow 829 15.4.1. Continuity equation 829 15.4.2. Momentum equation 829 15.4.3. Bernoulli’s or energy equation 829 15.5. Propagation of Disturbances in Fluid and Velocity of Sound 837 15.5.1. Derivation of sonic velocity (velocity of sound) 837 15.5.2. Sonic velocity in terms of bulk modulus 838 15.5.3. Sonic velocity for isothermal process 839 15.5.4 Sonic velocity for adiabatic process 839 15.6. Mach Number 840

15.7.
Propagation of Disturbance in Compressible Fluid
841 15.8. Stagnation Properties 844 15.8.1. Expression for stagnation pressure (
p
s
) in compressible flow 844 15.8.2. Expression for stagnation density (
ρ
s
) 846 15.8.3. Expression for stagnation temperature (
T
s
) 847 15.9. Area-velocity Relationship and Effect of Variation of Area for Subsonic,Sonic and Supersonic Flows 850 15.10. Flow of Compressible Fluid Through a Convergent Nozzle 852 15.11. Variables of Flow in terms of Mach Number 857 15.12. Flow Through Laval Nozzle (Convergent-Divergent Nozzle) 860 15.13. Shock Waves 865 15.13.1. Normal shock wave 866 15.13.2. Oblique shock wave 868 15.13.3. Shock strength 868 15.14. Measurement of Compressible Flow 870 15.15. Flow of Compressible Fluid Through Venturimeter 870
Highlights
873
Objective Type Questions
876
Theoretical Questions
878
Unsolved Examples
878

  1. FLOW IN OPEN CHANNELS 880—958

A. UNIFORM FLOW
16.1. Introduction 880 16.1.1. Definition of an open channel 880 16.1.2. Comparison between open channel and pipe flow 880 16.1.3. Types of channels 881 16.2. Types of Flow in Channels 881 16.2.1. Steady flow and unsteady flow 882 16.2.2. Uniform and non-uniform (or varied) flow 882 16.2.3. Laminar flow and turbulent flow 882 16.2.4. Subcritical flow, critical flow and supercritical flow 882 16.3. Definitions 883 16.4. Open Channel Formulae for Uniform Flow 884 16.4.1. Chezy’s formula 884 16.5. Most Economical Section of a Channel 889 16.5.1. Most economical rectangular channel section 890 16.5.2. Most economical trapezoidal channel section 892 16.5.3. Most economical triangular channel section 908 16.5.4. Most economical circular channel section 910 16.6. Open Channel Section for Constant Velocity at all Depths of Flow 914

B. NON-UNIFORM FLOW
16.7. Non-uniform Flow Through Open Channels 917 16.8. Specific Energy and Specific Energy Curve 917 16.9. Hydraulic Jump or Standing Wave 923 16.10. Gradually Varied Flow 938 16.10.1. Equation of gradually varied flow 938 16.10.2. Back water curve and afflux 940 16.11. Measurement of Flow of Irregular Channels 948 16.11.1. Area of flow 948 16.11.2. Mean velocity of flow 948
Highlights
951
Objective Type Questions
954
Theoretical Questions
956
Unsolved Examples

957

  1. UNIVERSITIES’ QUESTIONS (LATEST) WITH “SOLUTIONS” 959—994 OBJECTIVE TYPE TEST QUESTIONS 995—1046


Features

• It deals with the various topics of the subject systematically and exhaustively.
• Subject matter has been prepared in a lucid, direct and easily understandable style.
• Simple diagrams and solved examples have been amply provided in various chapters, wherever required.
• At the end of each chapter, Highlights, Multiple-choice Questions, Theoretical Questions and Unsolved Examples have been added to make this treatise a completed and comprehensive book on the subject.

A Textbook of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulic Machines, 6/e

ISBN:9789385401374
Pages:1590
Binding:Paperback
Language:English
Imprint:S. Chand Publishing
Trim size:6.75″ x 9.5″ inches
Weight:1.5kg
© year:2015


Title Fluid Mechanics & Hydraulic Machines
Author R. K. Rajput
Edition 5th
Publisher S. Chand Limited, 2008
ISBN 8121916666, 9788121916660
Length 1421 pages  


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