Download Clinically Oriented Anatomy by Keith L. Moore

Clinically Oriented Anatomy by Keith L. Moore pdf

Download Clinically Oriented Anatomy free PDF by Keith L. Moore -Renowned for comprehensive coverage, the best-selling Clinically Oriented Anatomy guides students from initial anatomy and foundational science courses through clinical training and practice.

Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF

The eighth edition reflects significant new information and updates and maintains the highest standards for scientific and clinical accuracy. Comprehensive updates reflect changes in the clinical application of anatomy as well as new imaging technologies, focusing on the anatomy that students need to know.

Features Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF

  • Extensively revised “Clinical Blue Boxes” explore the practical applications of anatomy, and helpful icons distinguish the type of clinical information covered in each.
  • Clinically relevant anatomy focuses on physical diagnosis, interpretation of diagnostic imaging, and understanding the anatomical basis of emergency medicine and general surgery.
  • Insightfully rendered, anatomically accurate illustrations, with updates throughout, make this book an aesthetically rewarding learning resource. Combined with many photographs and medical images, these stunning visuals facilitate comprehension of anatomical concepts and retention of “mental images” of anatomical structures.
  • New and updated medical imaging and integrated surface anatomy within each chapter demonstrates the relationship between anatomy, physical examination, and diagnosis.
  • Expanded “Overview and Basic Concepts” chapter includes functional systemic anatomy summaries and introduces approaches to studying anatomy, terminology, imaging, and more.
  • Inclusion of new sections describing the enteric nervous system (considered by some as a “second brain”) and its unique role in the innervation of the digestive system gives students cutting-edge insight into this significant scientific discovery.
  • A more realistic approach to the musculoskeletal system explores the action and use of muscles and muscle groups in daily activities, emphasizing gait and grip.
  • “Bottom Line” boxes summarize information to facilitate ongoing review and underscore the big-picture viewpoint.
  • Clinical Blue Box animations, case studies, and interactive multiple-choice questions online at thePoint.lww.com facilitate review and self-testing.

Table of Content – Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF

Contents
Preface /
Acknowledgments /
List of Clinical Blue Boxes /
Figure Credits /
1 Overview and Basic Concepts /
APPROACHES TO STUDYING ANATOMY /
Regional Anatomy /
Systemic Anatomy /
Clinical Anatomy /
ANATOMICOMEDICAL TERMINOLOGY /
Anatomical Position /
Anatomical Planes /
Terms of Relationship and Comparison /
Terms of Laterality /
Terms of Movement /
ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS /
INTEGUMENTARY SYSTEM /
FASCIAS, FASCIAL COMPARTMENTS, BURSAE, AND POTENTIAL SPACES /
SKELETAL SYSTEM /
Cartilage and Bones /
Classification of Bones /
Bone Markings and Formations
Bone Development /
Vasculature and Innervation of Bones /
Joints /
MUSCLE TISSUE AND MUSCULAR SYSTEM /
Types of Muscle (Muscle Tissue) /
Skeletal Muscles /
Cardiac Striated Muscle /
Smooth Muscle /
CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM /
Vascular Circuits /
Blood Vessels /
LYMPHOID SYSTEM /
NERVOUS SYSTEM /
Central Nervous System /
Peripheral Nervous System /
Somatic Nervous System /
Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) /
MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES /
Conventional Radiography /
Computed Tomography /
Ultrasonography /
Magnetic Resonance Imaging /
Nuclear Medicine Imaging /

2 Back /
OVERVIEW OF BACK AND VERTEBRAL COLUMN /
VERTEBRAE /
Structure and Function of Vertebrae /
Regional Characteristics of Vertebrae /
Ossification of Vertebrae /
Variations in Vertebrae /
VERTEBRAL COLUMN /
Joints of Vertebral Column /
Movements of Vertebral Column /
Curvatures of Vertebral Column /
Vasculature of Vertebral Column /
Nerves of Vertebral Column /
MUSCLES OF BACK /
Extrinsic Back Muscles /
Intrinsic Back Muscles /
Surface Anatomy of Back Muscles /
Suboccipital and Deep Neck

Muscles /
CONTENTS OF VERTEBRAL CANAL /
Spinal Cord /
Spinal Nerves and Nerve Roots /
Spinal Meninges and Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) /
Vasculature of Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerve Roots /

3 Upper Limb /
OVERVIEW OF UPPER LIMB /
COMPARISON OF UPPER AND LOWER LIMBS /
BONES OF UPPER LIMB /
Clavicle /
Scapula /
Humerus /
Bones of Forearm /
Bones of Hand /
Surface Anatomy of Upper Limb Bones /
FASCIA, EFFERENT VESSELS, CUTANEOUS INNERVATION, AND MYOTOMES OF UPPER LIMB /
Fascia of Upper Limb /
Venous Drainage of Upper Limb /
Lymphatic Drainage of Upper Limb /
Cutaneous Innervation of Upper Limb /
Motor Innervation (Myotomes) of Upper Limb /
ECTORAL AND SCAPULAR REGIONS /
Anterior Axio-appendicular Muscles /
Posterior Axio-Appendicular and Scapulohumeral Muscles /
Surface Anatomy of Pectoral, Scapular, and Deltoid Regions /
Axillary Artery /
Axillary Vein /
Axillary Lymph Nodes /
Brachial Plexus /
ARM /
Muscles of Arm /
Brachial Artery /
Veins of Arm /
Nerves of Arm /
Cubital Fossa /
Surface Anatomy of Arm and Cubital Fossa /
FOREARM /
Compartments of Forearm /
Muscles of Forearm /
Arteries of Forearm /
Veins of Forearm /
Nerves of Forearm /
Surface Anatomy of Forearm /
HAND /
Fascia and Compartments of Palm /
Muscles of Hand /
Long Flexor Tendons and Tendon Sheaths in Hand /
Arteries of Hand /
Veins of Hand /
Nerves of Hand /
Surface Anatomy of Hand /
JOINTS OF UPPER LIMB /
Sternoclavicular Joint /
Acromioclavicular Joint /
Glenohumeral Joint /
Elbow Joint /
Proximal Radio-Ulnar Joint /
Distal Radio-Ulnar Joint /
Wrist Joint /
Intercarpal Joints /
Carpometacarpal and Intermetacarpal Joints /
Metacarpophalangeal and Interphalangeal Joints /

4 Thorax /
OVERVIEW OF THORAX /
THORACIC WALL /
Skeleton of Thoracic Wall /
Thoracic Apertures /
Joints of Thoracic Wall /
Movements of Thoracic Wall /
Muscles of Thoracic Wall /
Fascia of Thoracic Wall /
Nerves of Thoracic Wall /
Vasculature of Thoracic Wall /
Breasts /
Surface Anatomy of Thoracic Wall /
VISCERA OF THORACIC CAVITY /
Pleurae, Lungs, and Tracheobronchial Tree /
Overview of Mediastinum /
Pericardium /
Heart /
Superior Mediastinum and Great Vessels /
Posterior Mediastinum /
Anterior Mediastinum /
Surface Anatomy of Heart and Mediastinal Viscera /
Auscultatory Areas /

5 Abdomen /
OVERVIEW: WALLS, CAVITIES, REGIONS, AND PLANES /
ANTEROLATERAL ABDOMINAL WALL /
Fascia of Anterolateral Abdominal Wall /
Muscles of Anterolateral Abdominal Wall /
Neurovasculature of Anterolateral Abdominal Wall /
Internal Surface of Anterolateral Abdominal Wall /
Inguinal Region /
Spermatic Cord, Scrotum, and Testes /
Surface Anatomy of Anterolateral Abdominal Wall /
PERITONEUM AND PERITONEAL CAVITY /
Embryology of Peritoneal Cavity /
Peritoneal Formations /
Subdivisions of Peritoneal Cavity /
ABDOMINAL VISCERA /
Overview of Abdominal Viscera and Digestive Tract /
Esophagus /
Stomach /
Small Intestine /
Large Intestine /
Spleen /
Pancreas /
Liver /
Biliary Ducts and Gallbladder /
Kidneys, Ureters, and Suprarenal Glands /
Summary of Innervation of Abdominal Viscera /
DIAPHRAGM /
Vessels and Nerves of Diaphragm /
Diaphragmatic Apertures /
Actions of Diaphragm /
POSTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL /
Fascia of Posterior Abdominal Wall /
Muscles of Posterior Abdominal Wall /
Nerves of Posterior Abdominal Wall /
Vessels of Posterior Abdominal Wall /
SECTIONAL MEDICAL IMAGING OF ABDOMEN /

6 Pelvis and Perineum
INTRODUCTION TO PELVIS AND PERINEUM /
PELVIC GIRDLE /
Bones and Features of Pelvic Girdle /
Orientation of Pelvic Girdle /
Pelvic Girdle Sexual Differences /
Joints and Ligaments of Pelvic Girdle /
PELVIC CAVITY /
Walls and Floor of Pelvic Cavity /
Peritoneum and Peritoneal Cavity of Pelvis /
Pelvic Fascia /
NEUROVASCULAR STRUCTURES OF PELVIS /
Pelvic Arteries /
Pelvic Veins /
Lymph Nodes of Pelvis /
Pelvic Nerves /
PELVIC VISCERA /
Urinary Organs /
Rectum /
Male Internal Genital Organs /
Female Internal Genital Organs /
Lymphatic Drainage of Pelvic Viscera /
PERINEUM /
Fasciae and Pouches of Urogenital Triangle /
Features of Anal Triangle /
Male Urogenital Triangle /
Female Urogenital Triangle /
SECTIONAL MEDICAL IMAGING OF PELVIS AND PERINEUM /
Magnetic Resonance Imaging /

7 Lower Limb /
OVERVIEW OF LOWER LIMB /
DEVELOPMENT OF LOWER LIMB /
BONES OF LOWER LIMB /
Arrangement of Lower Limb Bones /
Hip Bone /
Illium /
Femur /
Patella /
Tibia and Fibula /
Bones of Foot /
Surface Anatomy of Bones of Foot
FASCIA, VEINS, LYMPHATICS, EFFERENT VESSELS, AND CUTANEOUS NERVES OF LOWER LIMB /
Subcutaneous Tissue and Fascia /
Venous Drainage of Lower Limb /
Lymphatic Drainage of Lower Limb /
Cutaneous Innervation of Lower Limb /
Motor Innervation of Lower Limb /
POSTURE AND GAIT /
Standing at Ease /
Walking: The Gait Cycle /
ANTERIOR AND MEDIAL REGIONS OF THIGH /
Organization of Proximal Lower Limb /
Anterior Thigh Muscles /
Medial Thigh Muscles /
Neurovascular Structures and Relationships in Anteromedial Thigh /
Surface Anatomy of Anterior and Medial Regions of Thigh /
GLUTEAL AND POSTERIOR THIGH REGIONS /
Gluteal Region: Buttocks and Hip Region /
Muscles of Gluteal Region /
Posterior Thigh Region /
Neurovascular Structures of Gluteal and Posterior Thigh Regions /
Surface Anatomy of Gluteal and Posterior Thigh Regions /
POPLITEAL FOSSA AND LEG /
Popliteal Region /
Anterior Compartment of Leg /
Lateral Compartment of Leg /
Posterior Compartment of Leg /
Surface Anatomy of Leg /
FOOT /
Skin and Fascia of Foot /
Muscles of Foot /
Neurovascular Structures and Relationships in Foot /
Surface Anatomy of Ankle and Foot Regions /
JOINTS OF LOWER LIMB /
Hip Joint /
Knee Joint /
Tibiofibular Joints /
Ankle Joint /
Foot Joints /
Surface Anatomy of Joints of Knee, Ankle, and Foot /

8 Head /
OVERVIEW OF HEAD /
CRANIUM /
Facial Aspect of Cranium /
Lateral Aspect of Cranium /
Occipital Aspect of Cranium /
Superior Aspect of Cranium /
External Surface of Cranial Base /
Internal Surface of Cranial Base /
Walls of Cranial Cavity /
Regions of Head /
FACE AND SCALP /
Face /
Scalp /
Muscles of Face and Scalp /
Nerves of Face and Scalp /
Superficial Vasculature of Face and Scalp /
Surface Anatomy of Face /
CRANIAL MENINGES /
Dura Mater /
Arachnoid Mater and Pia Mater /
Meningeal Spaces /
BRAIN /
Parts of Brain /
Ventricular System of Brain /
Arterial Blood Supply to Brain /
Venous Drainage of Brain /
EYE, ORBIT, ORBITAL REGION, AND EYEBALL /
Orbits /
Eyelids and Lacrimal Apparatus /
Eyeball /
Extra-ocular Muscles of Orbit /
Nerves of Orbit /
Vasculature of Orbit /
Surface Anatomy of Eye and Lacrimal Apparatus /
PAROTID AND TEMPORAL REGIONS, INFRATEMPORAL FOSSA, AND TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT /
Parotid Region /
Temporal Region /
Infratemporal Fossa /
ORAL REGION /
Oral Cavity /
Lips, Cheeks, and Gingivae /
Teeth /
Palate /
Tongue /
Salivary Glands /
PTERYGOPALATINE FOSSA /
Pterygopalatine Part of Maxillary Artery /
Maxillary Nerve /
NOSE /
External Nose /
Nasal Cavities /
Vasculature and Innervation of Nose /
Paranasal Sinuses /
EAR /
External Ear /
Middle Ear /
Internal Ear /

9 Neck
OVERVIEW /
BONES OF NECK /
Cervical Vertebrae /
Hyoid Bone /
FASCIA OF NECK /
Cervical Subcutaneous Tissue and Platysma /
Deep Cervical Fascia /
SUPERFICIAL STRUCTURES OF NECK: CERVICAL REGIONS /
Sternocleidomastoid Region /
Posterior Cervical Region /
Lateral Cervical Region /
Anterior Cervical Region /
Surface Anatomy of Cervical Regions and Triangles of Neck /
DEEP STRUCTURES OF NECK /
Prevertebral Muscles /
Root of Neck /
VISCERA OF NECK /
Endocrine Layer of Cervical Viscera /
Respiratory Layer of Cervical Viscera /
Alimentary Layer of Cervical Viscera /
Surface Anatomy of Endocrine and Respiratory Layers of Cervical Viscera /
LYMPHATICS OF NECK /

10 Cranial Nerves /
OVERVIEW /
OLFACTORY NERVE (CN I) /
OPTIC NERVE (CN II) /
OCULOMOTOR NERVE (CN III) /
TROCHLEAR NERVE (CN IV) /
TRIGEMINAL NERVE (CN V) /
Ophthalmic Nerve (CN V1) /
Maxillary Nerve (CN V2) /
Mandibular Nerve (CN V3) /
ABDUCENT NERVE (CN VI) /
FACIAL NERVE (CN VII) /
Somatic (Branchial) Motor /
Visceral (Parasympathetic) Motor /
Somatic (General) Sensory /
Special Sensory (Taste) /
VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE (CN VIII) /
GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NERVE (CN IX) /
Somatic (Branchial) Motor /
Visceral (Parasympathetic) Motor /
Somatic (General) Sensory /
Special Sensory (Taste) /
Visceral Sensory /
VAGUS NERVE (CN X) /
SPINAL ACCESSORY NERVE (CN XI) /
HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE (CN XII) /
Appendix /
Index /


Editorial Reviews – Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF

Reviewer: Mark Jaffe, DPM, MHSA (Nova Southeastern University)
Description: In this sixth edition of a detailed textbook of regional anatomy, the authors carefully juxtapose clinical correlates with normal functional anatomy. This edition updates and improves upon the content and layout of the 2005 edition. (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)
Purpose: The primary purpose is to provide a comprehensive resource for students to help close the gap created by the reduction in time devoted to formal anatomy teaching in medical and allied health programs. There is obviously a vital role for an authoritative textbook of clinical anatomy to help students progress beyond memorization to clinical application, and this book meets the authors’ objectives. (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)
Audience: The intended audience is beginning health science students even if they have not been exposed to anatomy previously. However, the book’s detail may be more than first-year medical students or allied health students need during their introductory anatomy course. That said, upper level medical and allied health students will find this an excellent resource to prepare them for physical diagnosis and diagnostic imaging interpretation. The first editor, Keith L. Moore, is well known and respected in this area. He has previously teamed with Arthur F. Dalley, and for this edition, has added Anne M. R. Agur as an additional coauthor.
Features: The introductory chapter provides a brief systemic overview of anatomy, including basic terminology, which prepares readers for the regional anatomy chapters. Those chapters combine a plethora of color illustrations with the detailed text descriptions. Color-coded tables are strategically located throughout each chapter. The popular clinical “Blue Boxes” are grouped together toward the end of each chapter. Each chapter concludes with “The Bottom Line” summary of salient facts. The book includes access to a student companion website, which gives students the ability to search the entire contents of the book and access to USMLE-style case studies and quizzes. Not surprisingly, neuroanatomy is the weakest area, although the final chapter (chapter 9) is a summary review of the cranial nerves. (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)
Assessment: This is an excellent anatomy reference and it provides the resources to expand one’s mastery of the subject. However, it may be more detailed than introductory students need. Gray’s Anatomy for Students, 2nd Edition, Drake et al. (Elsevier, 2010), would be a better required text for novice anatomy students. Overall, this new edition improves upon the fifth edition with better artwork and the use of a more student-friendly layout. By incorporating insights from students, anatomists, and clinicians, the authors have made what was already an excellent clinical anatomy textbook an even better one.Doody’s Review Service

“The study of anatomy is often a challenging endeavour for many medical students. Central to the learning process is the use of a good textbook. Two of the most often recommended texts for medical students are Gray’s Anatomy for Students (GAS), descended from the iconic text by Henry Gray, and Clinically Oriented Anatomy (COA), by Moore, Dalley and Agur.

“Both texts employ a regional approach to the study of anatomy. GAS separates each chapter into four sections: Conceptual Overview, Regional Anatomy, Surface Anatomy and Clinical Cases. The conceptual overview aims to provide the very basic concepts of each region in a concise summary before moving on to an increasingly detailed description. While this approach may be useful for the beginner or reviewer, the inevitable repetition creates a degree of redundancy. COA presents information in a ‘bones up’ format, progressively adding surrounding structures before detailing the arthrology of each region. Each chapter concludes with a series of radiographic images to complement integration and understanding.

“Certain striking distinctions are evident in the textual quality of each book. GAS aims to strip away irrelevant information into an easy-to-read summation while leaving intricate details for other texts. While this provides an excellent introduction for the neophyte, COA includes more rigorous explanations concerning the finer points and the complex interaction with surrounding structures. An enlightening example of the differing styles can be observed through the treatment attributed to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle. (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)

A concise, tabular description of muscular attachments, innervations and basic function is provided in GAS in association with a stylised diagram indicating its position in the neck. Conversely, COA devotes an entire four page sub-section to a detailed discussion of the manner in which body position and the use of synergist muscle groups can alter function of the SCM beyond an isolated view of the muscle acting independently in the anatomical position. Thus, while simplified to enhance the initial integration of basic concepts, GAS may simultaneously perpetuate certain erroneous notions concerning the nature of anatomical function. On the other hand, the text in COA may reduce its effectiveness for the uninitiated, while GAS may prove to be too simplistic for the interested student.
“Both books approach diagrammatical representation through the use of computer-generated imagery, though distinct dissimilarities are visible.  (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)

COAdepicts each region by incorporating detailed and realistic diagrams which are thoroughly labelled. In contrast, GASrepresents analogous images through a distinctly stylised fashion. Major structures are portrayed in an idealistic mode, which, in combination with relatively sparse labelling, may impede practical application, particularly in medical courses focussed on anatomical dissections. However the simplified overview, devoid of extensive detail, is potentially easier to comprehend for the less experienced anatomist. In addition to detailed, accurate labels, COAconsolidates diagrammatic elements through representations in various anatomical planes. The depiction of distinct layers within each system aids the appreciation of the detailed nature of such structures. Ultimately, COAassociates these illustrative characteristics through the use of numerous, detailed figures within each specified anatomical region. The use of COAmay prove to be beneficial, both in dissection and in providing a broader scope of understanding. (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)

“The integration of clinical aspects throughout a text is essential to the effective understanding of anatomical information. Both books appear to have achieved a relatively streamlined integration of such information through the utilisation of clinical vignettes. Complemented with relevant diagrams, topics covered in the text of these vignettes include information relating to development, anatomical variation, radiology and pathology. For those without significant exposure to anatomy, having clinical information presented in such a fashion is an ideal mode for the consolidation of vital concepts. The use of end of chapter case studies in GASallows the reader to evaluate their own level of understanding, a feature that is absent in COA. Radiological correlations in GASare discussed further through an in-text approach. Alternatively, COA utilises radiological imaging juxtaposed with easily understood computer generated diagrams, allowing the student to understand the concepts therein with more clarity. (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)

“Through our experience in both learning and teaching, we believe that COA delivers a more comprehensive insight into the study of anatomy. Not only does it encompass a strong clinical foundation, it provides the reader with enhanced factual information and diagrams. Contrastingly, GAS offers equivalent aspects in a more concise, readable form yet neglects more in-depth explanations. The choice of textbook will ultimately depend on both the school curriculum and the eagerness of individual students. Whilst providing an excellent synopsis into the anatomical world, the possibility exists that students may find GAS lacking after covering the basic concepts. It is our view that COA offers greater scope for continued learning throughout medical school and beyond.”—Australian Medical Student JournalAustralian Medical Student Journal – David Sparks


“In my opinion it’s the single best anatomy work available world-wide.”—O. Paul Gobee, MD, Assistant Professor, Developer Anatomical E-learning, Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Centern/a – O. Paul Gobee

“The study of anatomy is often a challenging endeavour for many medical students. Central to the learning process is the use of a good textbook. Two of the most often recommended texts for medical students are Gray’s Anatomy for Students (GAS), descended from the iconic text by Henry Gray, and Clinically Oriented Anatomy (COA), by Moore, Dalley and Agur.

“Both texts employ a regional approach to the study of anatomy. GAS separates each chapter into four sections: Conceptual Overview, Regional Anatomy, Surface Anatomy and Clinical Cases. The conceptual overview aims to provide the very basic concepts of each region in a concise summary before moving on to an increasingly detailed description. While this approach may be useful for the beginner or reviewer, the inevitable repetition creates a degree of redundancy. COA presents information in a ‘bones up’ format, progressively adding surrounding structures before detailing the arthrology of each region. Each chapter concludes with a series of radiographic images to complement integration and understanding. (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)

“Certain striking distinctions are evident in the textual quality of each book. GAS aims to strip away irrelevant information into an easy-to-read summation while leaving intricate details for other texts. While this provides an excellent introduction for the neophyte, COA includes more rigorous explanations concerning the finer points and the complex interaction with surrounding structures. An enlightening example of the differing styles can be observed through the treatment attributed to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle. A concise, tabular description of muscular attachments, innervations and basic function is provided in GAS in association with a stylised diagram indicating its position in the neck. Conversely, COA devotes an entire four page sub-section to a detailed discussion of the manner in which body position and the use of synergist muscle groups can alter function of the SCM beyond an isolated view of the muscle acting independently in the anatomical position. Thus, while simplified to enhance the initial integration of basic concepts, GAS may simultaneously perpetuate certain erroneous notions concerning the nature of anatomical function. On the other hand, the text in COA may reduce its effectiveness for the uninitiated, while GAS may prove to be too simplistic for the interested student. (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)

“Both books approach diagrammatical representation through the use of computer-generated imagery, though distinct dissimilarities are visible. COAdepicts each region by incorporating detailed and realistic diagrams which are thoroughly labelled. In contrast, GASrepresents analogous images through a distinctly stylised fashion. Major structures are portrayed in an idealistic mode, which, in combination with relatively sparse labelling, may impede practical application, particularly in medical courses focussed on anatomical dissections. However the simplified overview, devoid of extensive detail, is potentially easier to comprehend for the less experienced anatomist. In addition to detailed, accurate labels, COAconsolidates diagrammatic elements through representations in various anatomical planes. The depiction of distinct layers within each system aids the appreciation of the detailed nature of such structures. Ultimately, COAassociates these illustrative characteristics through the use of numerous, detailed figures within each specified anatomical region. The use of COAmay prove to be beneficial, both in dissection and in providing a broader scope of understanding. (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)

“The integration of clinical aspects throughout a text is essential to the effective understanding of anatomical information. Both books appear to have achieved a relatively streamlined integration of such information through the utilisation of clinical vignettes. Complemented with relevant diagrams, topics covered in the text of these vignettes include information relating to development, anatomical variation, radiology and pathology. For those without significant exposure to anatomy, having clinical information presented in such a fashion is an ideal mode for the consolidation of vital concepts. The use of end of chapter case studies in GASallows the reader to evaluate their own level of understanding, a feature that is absent in COA. Radiological correlations in GASare discussed further through an in-text approach. Alternatively, COA utilises radiological imaging juxtaposed with easily understood computer generated diagrams, allowing the student to understand the concepts therein with more clarity.

“Through our experience in both learning and teaching, we believe that COA delivers a more comprehensive insight into the study of anatomy. Not only does it encompass a strong clinical foundation, it provides the reader with enhanced factual information and diagrams. Contrastingly, GAS offers equivalent aspects in a more concise, readable form yet neglects more in-depth explanations. The choice of textbook will ultimately depend on both the school curriculum and the eagerness of individual students. Whilst providing an excellent synopsis into the anatomical world, the possibility exists that students may find GAS lacking after covering the basic concepts. It is our view that COA offers greater scope for continued learning throughout medical school and beyond.”—Australian Medical Student Journal (Clinically Oriented Anatomy PDF)

— David Sparks, Gareth S. Davies, and Ashwarya Nath, All First Year Medicine (GradAustralian Medical Student Journal

In my opinion it’s the single best anatomy work available world-wide. (O. Paul Gobee, MD, Assistant Professor, Developer Anatomical E-learning, Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center)O. Paul Gobee

Product Details

ISBN-13:9781496347213
Publisher:LWW
Publication date:09/13/2017
Edition description:Eighth, North American Edition
Pages:1168
Sales rank:48,309
Product dimensions:8.40(w) x 10.90(h) x 1.80(d)

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